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AIR CARGO FOCUSCOMMENT


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86


Brokers argue that it can be cost-effective to make planned use of airfreight rather than just waiting for emergencies.


88 Brokers:


A look at the factors that enable some airports to specialise in project cargo.


91 Airports: July/August 2013 Supplement www.heavyliftpfi.com Down – but definitely not out before. A


ll-cargo airlines that do not have a healthy passenger revenue to fall back on are struggling to survive, attention-grabbing media headlines will tell you. But this is not an entirely new problem for the air cargo industry – the freighter operators have been here


There are clear signs of the weak performance of the global economy in the level of demand, said Lufthansa Cargo chief executive Karl Ulrich Garnadt on July 9, 2013 noting that the recent withdrawal of a number of cargo airlines from the market demonstrates the degree to which the air freight industry is struggling.


It is an old adage that the strong survive and there is no reason to believe that the current downturn in the fortunes of the freighter operator will prove otherwise. The weaker ones will drop off the radar, reducing the over-capacity problem as they do, but the fact will remain that the services the air freight industry offers to the way modern industry wants to work are just too vital to lose on a permanent basis.


The alternative is that there will be no freighter capacity available to move that emergency load when a broken piece of equipment threatens to stop production on an oil rig, an automotive production line has to shut down through the lack of one vital part, or a billion dollar construction project is put on hold until a vital component arrives. That type of action just costs too much money to even contemplate.


The project forwarding market would opt for ocean transportation for everything it moves over long distances – given the choice – for it costs much less. But life is never that simple and many of the air freight professionals interviewed for this special supplement of HLPFI will welcome the opportunity to discuss that point further with you – so read on.


Ian Martin Jones Editor, HLPFI


Supplement contents 94 Freighter operators:


There are a limited number of operators with the planes able to carry large cargoes, but carriers are always on the look out for project work they can handle.


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