This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
INDUSTRYPROFILE


Polet freighters: ‘Third Man’ eyes the future


Starting with one AN-30 aircraft serving the northern gasfields in Russia, Polet Airlines has over the years operated a wide range of Russian-built aircraft offering both passenger and freight uplift, but the company believes that it is in the outsize and super heavy cargo market where its future business model lies.


venture seem to grab all the large loads and the media headlines, there is a third AN-124 fleet of aircraft capable of handling heavy lift services on the sustained global basis required by the project forwarder. “From our operational base in Cyprus we are putting enormous effort into the worldwide market for outsize and heavy cargo,” said Anatoly Karpov, president of Polet Airlines. “Our business is a mix of government and military shipments, with a great deal of emergency relief work in cooperation with the international aid agencies, and of course we are planning an increasingly important role in the development of oil and gasfields, both in Russia and beyond.


W Largest payloads


The airline uses a fleet of giant AN-124-100 aircraft, which are well established as the worldwide solution for carrying the largest payloads and having the most accessible dimensions of any production-built aircraft. With a cargo payload of 120 tonnes and a hold of 750 cu m, the rear ramp can carry an extra five tonnes during flight. It is with these aircraft that Polet is looking for its heavy lift development, Karpov noted. “As we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the company, we can look back on a period when we operated many aircraft,” he observed, “but the hyper-inflation in 1993 had a disastrous impact on the whole industry and world economy – and by this time we had reduced our fleet to less than ten aircraft. Charters became our business.


84 July/August 2013


hile the large AN-124 fleets of Antonov Airlines and Volga-Dnepr Airlines operating through the Ruslan International marketing joint


the IL-96 has brought good experience and widened our client base… We are now looking at the A330 freighter for our future needs. We must achieve a fuel cost that can only be achieved with a twin-engine aircraft. In addition we enjoy traffic rights to certain destinations in the Far East.” Karpov went on: “We have been deeply involved in the launch of satellites and during 2009/10 we worked closely for over ten years with the Khrunichev space centre. In 2010, we transported the first stage KSLV-1 launch vehicle to Pusan in South Korea. It was a 36 m, 50-tonne payload.”


Telecom satellite


Karpov: “I believe that there are possibilities for developing the outsize and humanitarian business.”


“At that point Aeroflot monopolised the domestic Russian market, creating over-capacity. We then had to decide what direction we should take, and that decision was to seek business opportunities outside Russia in places such as South America, India, China and Africa. “We benefited from a strong and successful team in Cyprus and became a popular choice for charter brokers and in some cases direct clients. Our flexibility helped our reputation grow, especially amongst the large non-governmental agencies such as the United Nations and the International Red Cross.”


Karpov said: “In 2009, when fuel costs were manageable, we acquired the IL-96 freighter. The first year was profitable and then in 2010 fuel costs exploded yet again. At this point we were operating profitable flights to and from China with good loads in both directions.” However, he noted: “Unfortunately, the


ever-increasing cost of fuel began to make these flights non-viable. The operation of


He informed: “In June of this year, we operated a flight from Toulouse in France to the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan with the telecom satellite Astra 2E. This flight was provided on behalf of SDV France for the Astrium satellite producer. “The loading and unloading had to be completed in a very short period of time but the whole operation was successful and the satellite was delivered on schedule… and we look forward to expanding this kind of business.”


Karpov summed up: “I believe that the market for the logistics supply chain will change, with the big global manufacturers dictating operations. We know that market conditions for freighters are very difficult and there is much talk in the press about the end of the freighter as a cargo tool.” He concluded: “But I believe that there are possibilities for developing the outsize and humanitarian business. I believe that the market and the world economy will rise again, but we must all be patient and work hard to find new customers and applications for our freighters.” HLPFI


Over the last 40 years Anatoly Karpov has worked unceasingly within the Russian civil aviation industry. In 1997 he was appointed to lead the creation of the Air Launch Aerospace Corporation, working on a new aircraft rocket launch system. In 2000 he became an academician of the K.A. Tsiolkovsky Space Academy of Russia. He is also a trustee member of The International Air Cargo Association (TIACA).


www.poletairlines.com www.heavyliftpfi.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144