This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ANALYSISUK


A2SEA is in it for the long term


The UK is a key market for A2SEA, remarked Hans Schneider, chief operating officer at the Denmark headquartered specialist offshore wind farm installation and service solution provider. “We have worked at many UK based offshore sites, including West of Duddon Sands, and many more in the Irish Sea. Business is going really well at the moment. We have a few big contracts and two or three of these are running in parallel. Right now the UK is our strongest market for offshore wind farms. “In the short term we expect a small lull in


is currently the largest construction job in Europe. “We are expecting to grow the business in the heavy sector as construction in the London area continues to grow, especially the ground engineering sector. The Crossrail project is expected to last for another four years yet.”


Monks at BBC Chartering UK explained: “The oil and gas market is another important sector for us and in the UK it is mainly focused around Aberdeen and the northeast. Most of our UK vessel calls tend to be into one of these two areas.” He went on: “Latest estimates suggest there is at least another USD1 trillion of oil and gas reserves in the North Sea. With better extraction methods, reserves that were deemed uneconomical to exploit are now being extracted.


“The development and recent movement of rigs and platforms has meant we have brought several project cargoes into the UK of late to service this industry.”


Areas for growth


Civil at WWL ALS believes European project opportunities will be limited for the remainder of 2013 and that “the growth for project forwarding and heavy lift is going to come from markets such as Africa and the Middle East”.


Commenting on how the UK project market will grow, he observed: “This to a large extent depends on the political situation within the UK and Europe and other developing markets. Europe will remain a tough market for heavy lift and project forwarding over the next few years as economies struggle. “Any project opportunities will attract a lot of bidders and lead to a very competitive


80 July/August 2013


As container rates have fallen, the lines are now competing in our sector.


BBC Chartering & Logistics. – Jonathan Monks,


activity up until 2015-16 – still high but not as high,” said Schneider. However, the long-term prospects seem much more positive, with demand driven by the third round of offshore wind farm site allocations. The first two rounds of the allocations identified 8 GW of offshore wind farm sites. The third round alone could identify up to 25 MW of new offshore installation sites, he noted.


Schneider: “Right now the UK is our strongest market for offshore wind farms.”


“In the longer-term, after 2016… we hope that the market takes off,” he added. Earlier this year, A2SEA took delivery of its newest second-generation offshore wind turbine installation vessel, Sea Installer. “We are building and getting ready to receive our next vessel, Sea Challenger, in early spring next year,” Schneider concluded.


market from the suppliers/forwarders bidding, which is good for the client and harder for the suppliers,” Civil added.


Green initiative


The UK’s ‘2013 Infrastructure Review: Investing in Britain’s Future’ was published in June 2013 and the coalition government revealed plans for massive capital investment. The UK is preparing to invest around GBP100 billion (USD152.5 billion) in infrastructure projects over the next ten years.


Danny Alexander, chief secretary to the UK treasury, announced recently that “we need to invest in the fabric of our nation”, and described plans to invest in railways, roads and cleaner energy.


In the energy sector, the government will devote GBP10 billion (USD15.2 billion) to ensure the construction of the Hinkley PointC nuclear power plant, in Somerset. Alexander also promised an additional GBP800 million (USD1.2 billion) for the Green Investment Bank – a government-led bank committed to investing in green measures to grow the UK economy. It has been given the power to borrow a further GBP500 million (USD762.4 million) in 2015-16 to plough into low-carbon infrastructure projects.


Shale gas opportunity


A package of reforms to enable shale gas exploration is also under way. Locked away underneath northern England lies an estimated 1,300 trillion cu ft of shale gas, according to the latest British Geological Survey. It is estimated that shale gas could meet the UK’s natural gas demand for the next 25 years and fracking – the controversial means by which this resource can be extracted – could provide interesting opportunities for project cargo handlers. Alexander hopes that the energy measures will provide the support and political certainty to enable and attract approximately GBP110 billion (USD167.7 billion) of private sector energy investment over the coming years. The nation’s shale gas reserves could “be a new North Sea for Britain”, meeting more than a third of the UK’s annual gas needs, according to a report recently published by the Institute of Directors (IoD). But the conclusions come as potential development of shale reserves is raising environmental concerns and sparking fierce debate about costs and the role of shale gas in meeting future UK energy demand.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144