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ANALYSISRENEWABLES


Projects FPS moves a wind turbine in Sri Lanka.


Gihan Nanayakkara: “Wind power is a major focus of the Sri Lankan government.”


New wind power prospects


A growing number of developing countries around the world are now looking at wind power as a significant future source of energy generation. One of the latest examples is Sri Lanka where such a possibility was highlighted earlier this year when Projects FPS, a division of local international project forwarder FPS Sri Lanka, handled the shipment of six large wind turbines from India to a site 200 km inland from the Sri Lankan port of Colombo. “Wind power is a major focus of the Sri Lankan


main Dubai metropolis. That plant, stated First Solar, will be the first phase of the Mohammad bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, a more than USD3 billion project, which is expected to eventually cover 48 sq km and produce 1,000 MW of clean energy for the national grid using both PV and solar thermal technology.


Solar potential


Commenting on the potential project forwarding business arising from such developments, TransProject’s St Germain pointed out that while it is true that solar panels could generally be shipped in containers, other equipment associated with the development of large-scale solar farms – for example, transmission lines to connect the panels to the grid they are feeding into – can be more typical project cargo. “Also, even though solar may not generally involve the shipment of huge components like wind turbine blades, it is important for developers to have a savvy project forwarder to make sure the goods are in the right place when they need to be assembled. So that market is of interest to us


68 July/August 2013


government. Many further similar shipments are therefore expected in the future,” commented Projects FPS. In that context, added Gihan Nanayakkara, chairman of FPS Sri Lanka and Projects FPS, the latter is already having discussions with “quite a few people”. To date, he explained, wind energy development in Sri Lanka has been limited to “one or two isolated examples” but that option is now starting to be looked at in a more commercial way. Such development, he


and we are talking to a couple of solar park developers at the moment,” she stated. Another potentially interesting renewable energy sector for project forwarders,


suggested, is likely to be driven primarily by private companies as the investment required for such projects is less than that for other energy generation options such as hydro. “It also generates revenue in terms of an investment because there is a government buyback agreement for power which can go on for 10-20 years,” he said. “So I see the private sector driving this particular sector, while the government gets involved with larger scale power projects such as coal or nuclear.” Nanayakkara added that initially, wind power development in Sri Lanka is likely to be focused on onshore projects rather than offshore.


continued St Germain, is biomass. “We have done such projects in the past and there are now some pretty sophisticated designs coming out for that type of plant. There can be some large pieces of equipment involved when it comes to their construction, so managing a complete biomass project will be very interesting to us.”


While wind is still a growth market … there are also negative influences at work. – Jacob Kjærgaard, Blue Water Shipping


The potential of the biomass sector as a source of project logistics business is also highlighted by Franco Ravazzolo, manager project logistics and breakbulk for Austrian worldwide freight transport and logistics provider Gebrüder Weiss, including the relevant activities of its Weiss-Röhlig joint venture companies. “Austria manufactures quite a lot of that sort of equipment and being there at the source of such manufacturing we have been quite early into this market. In fact, we have been in it for more than 10 years and we see that market continuing to grow,” he stated. “The dimensions of the cargo involved range from small units for a village plant, for example, which might fit into one 40 ft container, up to very large pieces of 100 or more tonnes and diameters of six or more metres.” HLPFI


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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