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SPOTCHECKSAFETY


2 x 6-axle lines coupled together longitudinally (see Figure 3). As this was close to the strength limitation of the trailer frame, it was jointly agreed to disconnect the two centre axle lines of the trailer, thereby reducing the bending moment in the trailer frame. Basically the reactor was loaded on a 12-axle line trailer, but the axles were grouped into four points, each consisting of five axles (one axle = four tyres = one suspension cylinder) (see Figure 3). By using the momentum formula, one can exactly calculate the load on each group of axles and consequently the load per axle.


Tipping angle


From the sequence of illustrations in Figure 4 (4.1, 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4), we can calculate the theoretical tipping angle of the trailer. The trailer will tip over when the combined CoG of trailer and load passes over the tipping line.


The tipping of a HPT can be avoided by raising the lower side of the trailer and ensure that the trailer bed stays level independent from the road camber (see Figure 4.4). In the example used in Figure 3, we did not take into consideration the


Figure 4.3 Figure 4.4


positive influence of the weight of the trailer, which lowers the CoG of the combined trailer-load combination. We calculated a theoretical tipping angle of 14.4°, based on a four-point suspension system and 9.1° for a three-point suspension system. So why did the trailer tip at a road camber of 2.8°?


The reason for this can be contributed to all of the following factors:  The reactor was not exactly loaded in the centre of the trailer;


 The deflation of tyres at lower side, when the trailer tilts;


 An inaccuracy in the exact location of the CoG of the reactor.


Figure 4.1 Figure 4.2


 And dynamic forces on the day, such as wind, speed and so on. We will continue the investigation of this case in the next issue of HLPFI.


HLPFI


Please note, this article is intended for guidance only. Whilst every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the contents, no responsibility will be accepted by the publishers for any errors.


Richard Krabbendam has been a heavy lift specialist during his whole working career after which he formed Krabbendam Advies Service. A Master of Mechanical Engineering from Delft University of Technology, he has worked with BigLift and Mammoet, and was a co-founder of ITREC. He helped to set up Jumbo Offshore and was involved in the development of its super heavy lift carrier fleet, the J-Class, which uses two 900-tonne mast cranes for subsea installation works. Since his retirement from Jumbo he has been working as a freelance trainer/engineering consultant.


www.jumbo-offshore.com www.heavyliftspecialist.com


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July/August 2013


61


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