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ANALYSISCANADA


niche business as well.


A highlight of last autumn involved the shipment to a Mississippi power plant of four enormous process towers manufactured by Hooper Engineered Vessels International (HEVI) located in the port of Hamilton. They were loaded aboard Jumbo Shipping’s Stellaprima for delivery via the port of Alabama.


Another positive development cited by Hodgson has been increased exports through the North American waterway of wind turbines from Minnesota to Spain, Brazil, and Nicaragua. Project shipments are an expanding area of general cargo traffic accounting for about 12 percent of the total St Lawrence Seaway volume of about 40 million tonnes.


Key players


While specialised, foreign-flag operators carry most of the project cargo coming into the country, Canadian shipping lines such as Fednav, the biggest oceangoing user of the Seaway, and Hamilton based tug/barge specialist McKeil Marine have become key players. “For us, the project sector remains a growing business line,” Paulo Pessoa, McKeil Marine’s vice president, business development, projects, told HLPFI. “Drawing on our experience in the past 24 months with Hibernia, Long Harbour Vale Inco, Voisey’s Bay and Iqualit logistics operations, McKeil Marine is leveraging into new opportunities on Canada’s east coast,” he added.


Over this period, the most spectacular operation was the transportation by nine tug and barge units of oversize modules and construction materials destined for the Vale


Hamilton based tug and barge specialist McKeil Marine has become a key player on the St Lawrence Seaway.


Inco nickel processing plant being built at Long Harbour, Newfoundland. This complex operation was carried out in partnership with Mammoet Canada Eastern Limited. Most of the project cargo was picked up in the USA and Canadian Great Lakes ports before being transported through the St Lawrence Seaway and then onto the Atlantic to Newfoundland. McKeil Marine has recently added new tugs and barges to its fleet, including three 400 ft x 100 ft (121.9 m x 30.5 m) deck barges and two Z drive tugs. The larger deck barges are well suited to long-term deployment in the oil and gas, mining and construction sectors. In conclusion, Pessoa affirmed that cargo movements of locomotives, cranes and a 1,200-tonne lifting capacity reachstacker in the first half this year have underscored McKeil Marine’s logistics management in ground transportation, heavy lift operations and terminal interface.


On the west coast, the Amix Group holds the region’s largest capacity for a single lift on the water of up to 600 tonnes, said Bruce


Jackson, project manager. This is thanks to the Arctic Tuk, a 346 ft x 105 ft (105 m x 32 m) barge equipped with a Manitowoc 4500 Series 3 crane and a 60 ft (18.2 m) Series 2 Ringer, which has been used for a broad range of jobs, including sunken vessel recovery, breakbulk loading and unloading, and several bridge lifts.


Windmill lifts


Amix Heavy Lift was commissioned to offload 100 ft (30.5 m) long windmill components last year from ship to shore using the Arctic Tuk, at the Duke Point facility of the port of Nanaimo. The barge- mounted crane was utilised for safety and practical considerations that a land-based crane could not easily satisfy. “This summer, the Arctic Tuk will be mobilised to lift three mobile hoppers, each weighing 200 tonnes,” Jackson said, adding: “Our crews will be building a rail track system on deck which will enable us to move the hoppers once aboard.”


HLPFI Railways handle more dimensional shipments


In the surface transportation sector, Canada’s two major continental railways, Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific (CP), have been structuring their fleets to handle steadily increasing heavy lift and dimensional traffic. It is estimated that project cargo today accounts for between 5 and 10 percent of their freight business as a positive outlook persists.


Both railways offer logistics services encompassing detailed dimensional clearance analysis of width and height in relation particularly to bridges, tunnels and overpasses. With manufacturers building larger wind turbine components such as nacelles, too, it is becoming more feasible to move them by rail.


48 July/August 2013


Transload facilities for truck to rail transfer are important, remarked Mark Hallman, CN director of


communications and public affairs. “CN’s value-added logistics solution also includes obtaining heavy-duty railcars for the dimensional load and/or containers for smaller components.” Asked to outline some of the 2013 dimension projects on CN’s agenda, Hallman said these include: the movement of vessels from North Vancouver, British Columbia, to the Fort McMurray gateway of the Alberta oil sands; power generating equipment from the Toronto region to Courtright, Ontario; transformers moving from the Port of Hamilton, Ontario, to Timmins and Pickering, Ontario; and wind turbine components moving from US origins to locations in southwestern Ontario.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


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