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ANALYSISTRAINING


Tinoco, industrial projects director, Iberia. Bellville Rodair does all its training on the job. “We keep surveyors on retainer in Rotterdam and Antwerp to provide in-house training, as well as port surveying,” said Walpole. “We have not found any external courses that are really suitable. We promote from within, too – identifying the right people and having them learn from more experienced staff.”


Right attitude


Panalpina Panprojects takes the same approach. “We want people with an end-to-end forwarding background,” Kent emphasised. “They must have the right attitude and want to learn about projects – and if the phone rings on the weekend, they have to answer it. I have sent people on courses to learn what a bill of lading is and other basic forwarding essentials, and we have had staff take Richard Krabbendam’s course, but most heavy lift/project training is done on the job. “People should go to as many different places as they can to see different ways of doing things, what problems occur, and so on. Sometimes people put things in a


They must have the right attitude and want to learn about projects – and if the phone rings on the weekend, they have to answer it. – Chris Kent, Panalpina Panprojects


container because they think it is easier – without realising that there is no way to get the cargo out of the container at the project site.”


Mike Cave, managing director of UK


headquartered Specialist Transport Group, also favours on-the-job training. “We are a project specialist, but do not really consider ourselves a forwarder,” he said. “In fact, 70 percent of our customers are forwarders. We move things like the London Eye and a wooden organ going from Iowa to a chapel at Oxford’s Merton College. No one runs courses for anything we do. “We identify someone from a forwarder, haulier or shipping company who we think will be good and who wants to move on and put them through a four to six-week induction course. Then we put them in the shallow end and see if they can swim. So we will start them with an easy job, like moving a 2 m wide load from the UK to Italy, and gradually increase the complexity of their projects. If they get in too deep, we pull them back for a while.” Finding the right people is not always


easy. As DHL’s Jones pointed out, no one says they want to be a forwarder, let alone a project forwarder: people tend to drift into the job. The problem is, without the right training – be it internal, external, on-the-job or third party – the ‘drifter’ can land themselves, and their company, in very deep water indeed. HLPFI


www.heavyliftpfi.com


July/August 2013


137


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