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ANALYSISTRAINING


teaches aspects of project movements related to loading and handling in port and on ships. Content can include rigging and lashing, loading and storage, how to plan routes and what sort of equipment will be needed, as well as planning projects, health and safety and compliance. “We get shippers, heavy hauliers, surveyors, carriers and forwarders on our courses,” said Holdrup at Proven Logistics Solution. “This gives a real mix of people who can learn from each other and see how their role fits into the overall picture. We teach all over the world, too. We are planning a course in Shanghai and another in Africa.”


Conference courses


As well as providing its own courses, such as a four-day programme in Houston in October, Proven Logistics runs courses at Breakbulk conferences, the next being the September event in New Orleans. But it is increasingly being asked to teach in-house, with courses tailored to the customer. “Global companies want global consistency,” Holdrup added. “They want all their staff to learn the same things in the same way.” Proven Logistics’ courses are also becoming more comprehensive. “We used to do a one-day workshop on one part of project logistics. Now we have launched a course to jump start people who have not had the opportunity to see the full end-to-end view of a project, so they can understand their role in the process.” ITI’s courses look at the assembly, use and disassembly of cranes and rigging, and the procedures and sequence of events for lifting. “Legislation governing assembly/ disassembly of cranes has been ramped up in North America following a series of accidents,” explained ITI chief executive Mike Parnell. “But since many of the players in the USA operate internationally, they take their training with them. “We have had more demand for training


Directors of construction, oil and gas and mining companies


worldwide are coming to us. – Mike Parnell,


Industrial Training International (ITI)


in-house, and for help in preparation for certification of crane operators, riggers and other heavy lift operators, too. Certification used to be a voluntary process, but is now becoming mandatory in many places, such as Singapore.” Surprisingly, perhaps, ITI has also had more requests for training from high-end executives at project companies – shippers, rather than forwarders or carriers. “Directors of construction, oil and gas and mining companies worldwide are coming to us,” Parnell said. “The emphasis is on leadership, as they want to be involved in planning of major projects. They also want to be able to ask their contractors the right questions and assess their performance.”


Heavy Lift Specialist’s two-day courses concentrate on technical preparation for handling and transport, with particular focus on how to avoid accidents. It, too, is increasingly asked to provide in-house sessions on lifting, rigging and so on. “More


Going native for professional talent


As one of the world’s most rapidly growing countries, Turkey is attracting talented native professionals as the country’s rapidly growing economy raises a big demand for experienced executives, said George Cross, international chairman of executive search company Stanton Chase London. “Ten years ago… Turkish companies were looking for foreign directors,” he remarked. “Today Turkish companies want to utilise Turkish


136 July/August 2013


professionals with global expertise.” Cross pointed to India as a prime example of a country where talented native professionals are returning to their homeland, as well as an increasing trend for young talent not to leave for career opportunities abroad in the first place. A skilled labour force of welders and engineers is difficult to find when capital projects are being constructed in developing countries, explained Robert Frei, EMEA regional practice


leader in the logistics and transportation division of Stanton Chase International, in a presentation made at the recent Breakbulk Europe event in Antwerp. Training programmes are a start, Frei said, but most skilled workers are imported on a temporary basis for the construction period of each project. He asked how the industry could adapt to deal with the issue, and whether a better way exists to develop a skilled local workforce.


www.heavyliftpfi.com


companies are realising that in order to carry out projects in a sound and safe manner, they have to educate their staff,” said Krabbendam.


The courses run by Rickmers, although primarily concerned with the shipping element of project work, are equally comprehensive. Training includes risk assessment for loading and handling heavy lift, terminals, claim adjustment, evaluating a bill of lading, compliance, packing and preparing heavy lift units, insurance, forces on cargo at sea, and general requirements in the transport chain and port. Every one-day course includes a site visit to a port, packing unit, shipper’s premises or similar facility, which brings us to another important aspect of project training: no one can learn everything they need to know from a classroom.


Feet in the fire


“People have to put their feet in the fire,” insisted Linda Burgers, head of special cargo at Houston based Pentagon Freight Services LLC. “They have to see and touch the cargo. They have to live it. Some things, like Incoterms, can be learned in a classroom (these are a series of pre-defined commercial terms published by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) that are widely used in international commercial transactions or procurement processes), but people have to talk to the customer and the operator – ideally in as many parts of the world as possible – in order to really understand project forwarding.” Other forwarders agree. International multimodal logistics provider Geodis supplements basic forwarder training, carried out at its G-Campus, with external training from different sectors, such as oil and gas or petrochemicals. It also sends staff to work in different countries to gain experience of different projects. “You have to be on site to learn,” emphasised Igor Muñis


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