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EQUIPMENT DIRECTORYBELOW THE HOOK more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


Irizar Forge, based in Spain, notes a need for forge sheaves with no welding.


kit to be supported in an increasingly heavy-duty environment.


The company often finds


have manufacturing technique differences and have different test characteristics than a polyester roundsling,” stated Jasany. “As the number of manufacturers and demand increases for this specialised type of sling, so does the need for a comprehensive performance standard. The WSTDA recognised this need in early 2009 and soon thereafter started the development process.” As part of WSTDA continuous revision, the Recommended Standard Specification for Synthetic Web Slings (WSTDA-WS-1), first published in 1978, is undergoing its fifth revision and soon to follow will be the sixth revision of the Recommended Operating and Inspection Manual for Nylon and Polyester Synthetic Web Slings (WSTDA-WS-2). Dutch shackle manufacturer


Van Beest, which has supplied 10 million of its popular Green Pin high-tensile units worldwide in the past five years – including increased bow ring versions to save sling wear and tear – has tested the breaking strength of combinations of roundslings and shackles in cooperation with Spanset GmbH, a specialist in lifting, securing and height safety solutions, and the German insurance technical committee DGUV. For roundslings of textile


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fibre content, the bend radius of the shackle can be a sharp edge. However, in force tests using the 250 and 600-tonne test rigs of Axzion, Spanset’s lifting beam manufacturer, Spanset’s high performance fibre slings and Van Beest’s smooth contact area Green Pin shackles passed all requirements in combinations of 0.5 to 150 tonnes.


Growing demand


The capacity of Green Pin shackles, manufactured at Sliedrecht under ISO 9001 certification, continues to increase in line with that of crane manufacturers. The current load support of


1,500 tonnes will be uprated to 2,000 tonnes in the new catalogue later this year. There are 18 variations of the Green Pin and among recent innovations are polar release shackles for use in Arctic drilling activity in Alaska and Russia, where users seek guarantees of material properties, and an underwater release shackle used with ROVs in oil and gas subsea work. Irizar Forge, based in Spain, customises a range of hooks designed according to the input it receives from customers, including the technical specifications of below-the-hook


there is a requirement for forge sheaves with no welding, particularly in marine environments. It has recently been involved in producing ROV hooks for mooring systems of 2,000-3,000 tonnes working load. One recent project entailed a forge sheave to cover a 2,000 mm diameter. Irizar Forge solutions for the oil and gas markets first undergo classification society design approval, followed by post-manufacture inspection and finish with full load testing. Irizar Forge also manufactures shackles and these can be part of the package that it supplies with the hook to clients in the subsea, FPSO and drilling rig sectors as a “one-stop shop”, according to Luis Benito,


commercial director. “The way we design and manufacture the hook is similar to the shackle,” he explained. Below-the-hook suppliers also keep pace with


developments in data storage; in particular, embedding RFID tags in equipment to facilitate access to maintenance data using hand-held terminals and special software, thus helping operators comply with the data-keeping requirements of various standards. With users needing manuals or test certificates around the clock, there is potential for reading data from the chips for immediate use at the point of lift. Lifting accessories specialist


Crosby Group has introduced equipment reference guides as Apps for iPhones, including a sling calculator. It also has a Quic-Check RFID system for inspection of slings and other products. HLPFI


Below the Hook Companies Name RAM Spreaders


Redaelli Tecna SpA Rhino Cargo Control Righetti Gilberto


Rope and Marine Services Limited Rope and Sling Specialist Ltd Ropeblock B.V.


Rotary Engineering UK Ltd Rotomatik (S) Pte Ltd


Shanghai Zhenhua Heavy Industries Co, Ltd Shelquip Ltd


Salzgitter Maschinenbau AG SpanSet, Inc. SSCS Ltd STAS


SWR Ltd.


Tandemloc, Inc Teufelberger


The Bilco Wire Rope & Supply Co The Caldwell Group, Inc. United Offshore Services Van Beest B.V. Verope AG


Versabar, Inc.


Vestil Manufacturing Wadra


William Hook Ltd Yoke Industrial Corp. Website


www.ramspreaders.com www.redaelli.com


www.rhinocargocontrol.co.uk www.righettisollevamenti.it www.ropemarine.com www.rssgroup.co.uk www.ropeblock.com www.rotary.co.uk www.rotomatik.com


Secutex www.secutex.de Seward Wyon


www.sewardwyon.co.uk www.zpmc.com


www.shelquip.com www.smag.de


www.spanset-usa.com www.sscsystems.com www.stas-levage.com www.steelwirerope.com www.tandemloc.com www.teufelberger.com www.bilcogroup.com www.caldwellinc.com www.uos-nl.com www.vanbeest.com www.verope.com www.vbar.com


www.vestilmfg.com www.wadra.com


www.williamhook.com www.yoke.net


HLPFI has made every effort to make this as complete a listing as possible. However if your company has been omitted and you would like it included next time, please contact us at editorial@heavyliftpfi.com


July/August 2013 131


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