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OVERLANDNEWS ROUND-UP more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


NEWS IN BRIEF Globalink projects


V. Alexander in long road moves


he Cargo Equipment Experts (CEE) network member for Germany, V. Alexander International Logistics, has moved a heavy heat exchanger from Berlin to Lavera, France. The 56-tonne unit (pictured) was transported on a heavy-duty trailer for four days over 1,800 km of European highways. In a separate move, the company coordinated


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new hours-of-service regulations that came into effect on July 1, 2013. Some are now warning of delays due to the early morning breaks mandated by the new law and others feel that shipping costs may rise due to the new regulations. The new regulations stipulate two work breaks


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rucking companies across the USA have been coming to terms with the


the overland transport of dismantled cranes weighing 2,500 tonnes on a 4,500 km journey from China to Bogouchany in Siberia. The shipment was moved on 45 fully-loaded


trucks to the Manzhouli Chinese border rail terminal from where it was transferred to 35 rail wagons for the remaining 2,500 km journey to Bogouchany.


US truckers question breaks


between 0100 and 0500hrs. This could have a significant impact on heavy lift


transportation, which typically takes place at night. Some trucking companies have asked whether it is possible to file for an exclusion from the new regulations and have requested the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) to challenge the new rules in the courts.


Sarr in 800 km haul


ndia based forwarder Sarr Freights Corporation has safely delivered 85 packages, each weighing 68 tonnes and measuring 16.77 m x 6.64 m x 3.18 m, from the sea port in Kolkata, India, to the NTPC Barh power plant in Bihar, some 800 km (500 miles) inland. Sarr Freights said it


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coordinated the Customs clearance proceedings and forwarding over the difficult Indian highway system.


Globalink Logistics Group, a member of the Worldwide Project Consortium (WWPC) representing Kazakhstan, has shipped a 50-tonne separator within the country from Kyzyl Orda to Zheskasgan. Globalink’s Tajikistan branch has also been busy transporting a 700-tonne crawler crane from Dushanbe to Alashankou in China.


WWL ALS hauls borer WWL ALS, a division of Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, recently coordinated the relocation of a tunnel boring machine from St John’s Wood in Central London, UK, to Haringey in outer London – a distance of only 9 km, but a journey involving four heavy loads encountering multiple bridge heights.


FPS moves bomber FPS New Zealand has moved the only operational De Havilland Mosquito bomber aircraft from New Zealand to Virginia Beach, USA. The container was shipped to Philadelphia, USA, where FPS arranged for the overland trucking of the 450 km last leg.


Bohnet delivers turbine Germany based heavy haulier and project forwarder Bohnet has completed its first assignment using 13 new InterCombi axle lines it recently acquired from Scheuerle when it was contracted by logistics firm Wallmann & Co to transport a 310-tonne Siemens gas turbine generator measuring 11 m x 4.8 m x 4.9 m through the streets of Hamburg.


we know what to do …


Your partner for the special ones in Poland & Eastern Europe since 2000 BEST Logistics Sp. z o.o., ul. Ks. Stanisława Kujota 18/21, 70-605 Szczecin, tel.: 91/4830820, info@best-logistics.com


Visit us at www.best-logistics.com www.heavyliftpfi.com July/August 2013 11


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