This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ANALYSISAUSTRALIA


expensive due to Perth being the only confirmed cargo Customs clearance point. Previously we have been able to operate through Port Hedland but this is not possible now due to Customs restrictions.” He continued: “Most cargo requests we receive for Australia are directed to the mining industry located in the northwest of Australia. This means that when flying from Europe/Middle East/Singapore we have to fly firstly to Perth for cargo Customs clearance before flying north to places like Karatha, Port Hedland and surrounding areas for final delivery. “From our operational view and for customer cost I believe that making Port Hedland a Customs clearance point for cargo would be a major step in the right direction. We could reduce time taken to deliver cargo whilst reducing cost due to the operational hours required to complete the flight.”


Bottlenecks


For sea cargo, the lack of regional port infrastructure continues to present problems. Consultant Olesen said Australia is still struggling with infrastructure bottlenecks.


“Whilst state and federal governments are well aware of the problems and shortcomings, they have been very slow to react. Generally, there is very limited willingness to invest public funds in port infrastructure.


“There is an expectation that private and public companies should be funding port developments. In West Australia, AMC in Henderson is a prime example of a government project that has become very successful. The fact that the state government had the foresight and was willing to invest prompted a development, which would otherwise not have taken place. “It is a shame that this success has not been replicated elsewhere in Western Australia. Instead, other projects – Oakajee and Browse for instance – are likely not going to happen, partly due to inertia on behalf of the state and federal governments.” How can these inadequacies be rectified?


“Australian state and federal governments have to drive the investments,” said Olesen. “One of the prime tasks of government is to do exactly that. To turn into being only a regulator instead of being a driver is not only counter-productive, but it shows a lack of responsibility and prudent governance. “Governments need to have visions and


drive. To leave that solely to private enterprise has the effect that some investments will not take place.”


100 July/August 2013 Austral Asia Line’s AAL Kembla carrying project cargo. www.heavyliftpfi.com


AN-124 on take-off. Ruslan International says it receives excellent service at all airports that it operates through in Australia.


Concerns about port infrastructure are echoed by Austral Asia Line (AAL), which has been involved in the Australian project and heavy lift market for nearly two decades, providing flexibility for forwarders with a semi-liner service.


AAL presently operates a fleet of 17 multipurpose heavy lift vessels, either group-owned or on long-term charter combined with a large array of vessels available on demand when needed. The permanent AAL fleet ranges from 12,800 to 31,000 dwt with a lifting capacity of up to 700 tonnes on most vessels.


The line has now expanded, creating a tramp division to offer tailor-made solutions for parcels of cargo outside the core Asia Pacific region. Frank O Mueller, general manager, said that as a leading carrier of breakbulk, heavy lift and general cargoes within the Asia Pacific region, AAL is well


aware of the logistical bottlenecks and other transport challenges inherent in the Australian project market.


“The majority of projects on the west and east coasts of Australia can be found in northern regions and are serviced by ports of often limited capacity,” he remarked. “With projects in peak supply period, insufficient port infrastructure can easily generate berthing delays of up to three to four weeks or more, especially when coinciding with infrastructure maintenance or upgrades as are often required.”


Core problem


A core problem, said Mueller, is that many ports and berths are predominantly designed for product exports rather than inbound breakbulk and heavy lift imports. “They often suffer from a small number of berths, shallow


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144