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production steps into account when developing a new product. This is made possible by a multi-level product design. This means that the product developer can design the final product, as it is filled in the packaging, and every sub-product, that is produced separately, at the same time. The optimization must optimize the composition of every sub- product in such a way that the nutritional requirements of the final product are fulfilled at the lowest cost. Every sub-compound is processed on its own during the production process. This can be a cooking process, a baking process or just a mixing process. These production and handling costs to generate the sub-products must be taken into account when optimizing the final product. When a baking process is involved, the evaporation of the sub-product must also be taken into account. A petfood program should therefore work simply; calculating


petfood diets in an Excel-like calculator, optimizing the diets to meet all the requirements and setting constraints on nutrients, ingredients or any other parameter. The program needs a multi-level diet design according to the process steps and split ingredients to be used in several dosing places. Furthermore, the program should take evaporation in account during the optimization of the diets.


Nutritional quality To reduce the nutritional variations of the end product, the BESTMIX program takes the real ingredient quality of every lot in account during production optimization. Batch stabilization also means on-line optimization, based on on-line production parameters, respecting


additional production rules. With the current pressure on quality control, traceability is a key feature by data logging and archiving functions.


Sales process Every product that is produced will be delivered to a number of stores. Each store requires a product specification, based on its individual standards. This leads to some tedious work to deliver the documents in the proper layout and content. An integrated declaration function can generate these product specifications automatically. When properly set up, all information for the private labels will be generated automatically.


Ingredient supply To control the ingredient flow in the plant, it is important that production plants have the ability to display a bill of material report, resolving every included sub-product. Only in this way is it possible to have the complete overview in one action. At quality control level, the program can generate verification reports:


the quality of the active products is checked, based on the current ingredient quality. BESTMIX also provides a recursive update. This is an update of the nutrient profiles of the included diets, and the main diets, based on actual ingredient quality with generation of all reports. Furthermore it is also possible to substitute ingredients by alternatives. For more information: www.feedformulation.com


Optimize your feed formulation


Staying ahead of the competition requires smart feed formula- tions. You – as formulation manager – are key in this strategy. But how do you create the best quality and lowest cost recipes – under any conditions and at any time? BESTMIX® provides the answer. This user-friendly software makes it easy to manage accurate nutritional values, production parameters and recipe specifications. You can adapt instantly to volatile material costs,


ingredient stocks and purchasing positions. The results are per- fect recipes that can be translated directly into practical products and synchronized automatically with labelling and safety data.


Want the least cost recipe, no matter how challenging the requirements? Call us today on +32 50 30 32 11 and get BESTMIX®


. The smartest way to beat the competition.


www.adifo.com Adifo develops and services sector-specific software tools for the international nutrition industry.


We enable you to gain maximum control over your core processes and guarantee the protection of critical business knowledge.


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