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WATERWAYS


THE INTRACOASTAL The Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway stretches more than


1,200 miles from Norfolk, Va. to Key West, Fla. The waterway runs through the First Coast and can be accessed by both commercial and recreational vessels.


The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers maintains the waterway,


which is used by the U.S. Coast Guard, and military equipment and supply transportation barges and vessels as well as commercial and charter fishing vessels, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration vessels, the Department of Energy research vessels, dredging vessels and other watercraft.


The Atlantic Intracoastals’ saltwater rivers, inlets, sounds


and man-made canals are open to recreational vessels providing opportunities to explore the many natural wonders the area has to offer. Residents enjoy sailing, kayaking, jet- skiing, tubing, boating and other leisure activities.


_________________________________________________________________________ Top Right: Dolphins, photo courtesy of JAX Chamber Top Middle: Boneyard Beach on Big Talbot Island, photo by Caleb Thompson Middle: South Ponte Vedra Beach, photo by Jacqueline Persandi


ST. JOHNS RIVER Among the wealth of rivers on the First Coast, the largest


is the St. Johns River. It provides a variety of activities for residents and visitors. Boaters can enjoy fishing, sightseeing, riverside parks and even restaurants. In Jacksonville, some of the biggest annual events take place on the river, such as the Fourth of July Fireworks Celebration and the Jacksonville Light Parade.


In other parts of the First Coast, rivers provide an excellent


escape for those who enjoy quiet camping and scenic boating. Visitors can find themselves surrounded by not only wildlife but also rich history. On Amelia River, boaters can cruise by historic landmarks such as Fort Clinch State Park. In St. Johns County, the Tolomato and Guana rivers surround Guana River State Park—believed to be where Ponce de Leon first landed in Florida. Further south in St. Augustine, sail around the Matanzas Bay and River to see spectacular views of the Castillo de San Marcos, the Bridge of Lions and the St. Augustine Lighthouse.


_________________________________________________________________________ Bottom Right: The St. Johns River, photo by Jacqueline Persandi Bottom Left: Intracoastal Waterway, photo courtesy of Jacqueline Persandi


BEACHES, PARKS & PRESERVES


1 American Beach 2 Atlantic Beach 3 Crescent Beach 4 Fernandina Beach 5 Jacksonville Beach 6 Mickler’s Beach Front Park 7 Neptune Beach


96


8 Peter’s Pointe Beach Front Park 9 South Ponte Vedra Beach


10 St. Augustine Beach 11 Usina Beach 12 Vilano Beach


1 John M. Bethea State Forest 2 Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge 3 Osceola National Forest 4 Camp Chowenwaw Park 5 Jennings State Forest 6 Big Talbot Island State Park 7 Little Talbot Island State Park


8 Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve


9 Four Creeks State Forest


10 Anastasia State Park 11 Faver-Dykes State Park 12 Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve


First Coast Relocation GuideTM 2013


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