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Military About 90,000 people on the First Coast are Active Duty


military or civilian employees of the area’s three naval bases, which brings the Navy’s local economic impact to more than $7.83 billion annually. Including spouses and children, there are more than 230,000 people in the military community on the First Coast. The following highlights the area’s three naval bases as well as the United States Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville, located across from Naval Station Mayport.


The Naval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jacksonville) is


a 2011 Presidential Navy Installation of Excellence Award winner and the premier installation for delivering effective, sustained and improved shore readiness for sailors, their families and the civilian workforce. The air installation is an operational headquarters for more than 110 tenant commands, including the Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven, 14 VP, VR and HSM operational and reserve squadrons and one training squadron. It is home to the largest squadron in the Navy—VP-30—a P-3C Orion and P-8A Poseidon fleet replacement training squadron. Major tenants aboard the base include Commander, Navy Region Southeast; Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast; Naval Hospital Jacksonville; Naval Supply Fleet Logistic Center, Department of Homeland Security and Border Patrol; and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. The Fleet Readiness Center


Southeast (FRCSE) performs refurbishment, repair and modification of aircraft, engines and aeronautical components in its mission to support the fleet, fighter and family.


As one of the most dynamic and diverse naval installations in


the world, employing 22,700 personnel, NAS Jacksonville is a primary instrument of national security and its warfighters are a key component in conducting the core capabilities of the U.S. Navy’s Maritime Strategy. NAS Jacksonville is the third largest naval installation in the country and has an annual regional economic impact of $2.1 billion. Located on nearly 4,000 acres along the beautiful St. Johns River, NAS Jacksonville also operates the Pinecastle Range Complex in the Ocala National Park (the only Navy range on the East Coast where warfighters can deliver live ordnance), and the Outlaying Landing Field Whitehouse. Throughout 2011 and most of 2012, NAS Jacksonville personnel were engaged globally while actively participating in the local communities within Northeast Florida, continuing their professional development and nurturing their families.


NAS Jacksonville personnel have a dynamic and flexible


presence around the world, which contributes to the unique strengths of the U.S. Navy. Its sailors and civilian workforce play a pivotal role in ensuring the security, prosperity and vital interests of the U.S. and its allies. Focused directly on support to operational units, air station personnel work around the clock providing services to its home-based squadrons as well as supporting numerous detachments, joint commands, government agencies and carrier readiness sustainment exercises. Annually, Air Operations handles over 70,000 flight operations and supports more than 20 detachments consisting of more than 6,000 personnel and 250 aircraft. The NAS Jacksonville team


_________________________________________________________________________ Left: A P-8A Poseidon aircraft from Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 flies over Naval Air Station Jacksonville, photo by MC2 Gulianna Dunn, U.S. Navy Photographer Bottom: The Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Georgia (SSGN 729) transits the Saint Marys River, photo by MC1 James Kimber, U.S. Navy Photographer


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