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Heritage Publishing, Inc. © 2013 The JAX Region is home to more than 80 corporate,


regional and divisional headquarters, including three Fortune 500 corporations. The region is also powered by a thriving small business community. The tax advantages of doing business in Northeast Florida are considerable. State corporate income tax is 5.5 percent on Florida income greater than $5,000. Corporations are free from tax on capital stock, and Florida is one of only three states that do not charge a personal income tax.


The low cost of conducting business in Northeast Florida


makes it one of the country’s most desirable locations. The area offers affordable and diverse commercial real estate opportunities, as well as low construction and utility costs. Construction costs in the region are nearly 20 percent below the national average, and lease rates for industrial space range from $2.87 to $9.08 per square foot for manufacturing and warehouse space. The overall office market’s average asking lease rate remains in the $13.42 to $22.82 range—all well below other major metropolitan areas.


KEEPING BUSINESS MOVING Northeast Florida is rapidly becoming a recognized


international trade center. Few places rival its central location. As the westernmost city on the eastern seaboard, companies can easily reach the enormous consumer population of the Southeast. Expansion Management magazine named Jacksonville in the top 50 on its list of “America’s Five-Star Logistics Metros” five years in a row—a ranking of the top cities for logistics in the United States—and Jacksonville’s foreign trade zone ranks third in the world by Foreign Direct Investment magazine.


“Jacksonville offers extraordinary regional, national and


international market access through its expanding intermodal transportation system that connects businesses here with nearly 50 million consumers within 600 miles of Northeast Florida, as well as the global marketplace,” says Michael Ward, president and CEO of CSX Corporation.


Jacksonville’s port system is the best location from which


to ship products to and from Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, eliminating the need for inland transportation through Florida. Jacksonville’s seaport is the No. 2 automobile processing port in the United States, and East Coast containerized shipping has swelled with increased trade from Asia, thanks to recent expansions at deep-water port facilities.


In addition to our exceptional port systems, Northeast


Florida has the clear competitive advantage with three major interstates, three railroads, Jacksonville International Airport and six other regional airports.


First Coast Relocation GuideTM 2013 Jacksonville International Airport (JIA) handles more than


5.5 million passengers each year, as well as 145 million pounds of cargo. More than a dozen major airlines and a network of regional carriers provide some 200 daily arrivals and departures from JIA.


TALENTED YOUNG WORKFORCE Northeast Florida has a highly skilled, youthful and diverse


workforce to meet the needs of expanding businesses. The median age in Jacksonville is 37, almost equal to the national average and significantly less than the state of Florida’s average. Our multicultural population has been growing at a healthy pace of nearly 2 percent per year, which is twice the national average.


Every year, more than 3,000 highly trained, mission-


oriented personnel exit or retire from military service, and 80 percent of those choose to stay in Jacksonville. Area employers and economic development groups applaud these prospective employees who are hard-working and disciplined, as well as trained in electronics, technical maintenance, repair and management.


Area leaders have created education programs, designed to


develop a competitive workforce. This includes the Aviation Center of Excellence, a leading training center for aviation- related skills, established by Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ). Aviation and aerospace companies looking to establish operations at Cecil Commerce Center can work with FSCJ to develop training programs for prospective employees and students.


ImpactJAX, the Chamber’s young professionals program,


connects 21- to 40-year-old professionals to the business community. The program provides a venue for young professionals to network with each other, develop personally and professionally, engage in the Chamber, and support activities and ideas that attract and retain young talent. For more information, visit www.impactjax.com.


Michael E. Locher @mlocherei: As a CEO of a Jacksonville headquartered growing business, I am grateful for the great community in which we live! #ilovejax #JAXChamber


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