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OPTIONAL PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS


Advanced International Certificate of Education Program The Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) Program is a rigorous college-preparatory curriculum and examination system,


sponsored by the University of Cambridge International Examinations (CIE). The program emphasizes independent research, initiative and creativity. To qualify for an AICE diploma, students must earn six credits by passing a combination of examinations in several subject areas. Florida’s public colleges and universities provide college credit for successfully passed exams, and students can earn up to 45 credits. This program is currently offered at certain high schools in Clay, Duval and St. Johns counties.


Advanced Placement The College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Program provides advanced courses to high school students with an opportunity to earn college


credit after the completion of each course. AP classes are beneficial to students, because they help broaden their academic skills, prepare them for college-level courses and give them an upper-hand in the college admission process.


Dual Enrollment This acceleration program allows students to simultaneously earn high school credit and credit toward a career certificate, or an associate


or baccalaureate degree. Another form of dual enrollment is early admissions, which permits students to enroll full-time in college or career courses at a postsecondary institution, thus obtaining high school and college/career credits for completed courses.


Gifted Programs These programs are provided to students identified as being gifted―those who have superior intellectual development and are capable of


high academic performance. Each district and school has their own requirements and rules for gifted programs. Some services provided to gifted students include accelerated instruction, such as independent study and enrichment instruction.


International Baccalaureate The four International Baccalaureate (IB) academic programs encourage international-mindedness and provide high-quality education. The


Primary Years Programme focuses on development inside and outside the classroom. The Middle Years Programme offers an academic challenge while providing life skills. The Diploma Programme consists of a rigorous two-year curriculum, where graduates receive an IB degree and are often given advanced placement at colleges and universities worldwide. The IB Career-related Certificate is new, and designed specially for students who want to engage in career-related learning. IB programs are currently offered at certain schools in Clay, Duval and St. Johns counties.


Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps The Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) program is designed to teach high school students the value of citizen leadership, teamwork


and self-discipline. The program also allows students to become more familiar with military services. High schools in all five counties offer JROTC programs for the Air Force, Army, Marines or Navy military branches.


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