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County Health Departments


Baker County ..........................................................259-6291 Clay County ............................................................272-3177 Duval County (Immunization Center) ....................253-1420 Nassau County ........................................................548-1800 St. Johns County......................................................825-5055


FLORIDA’S K-12 STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT PROGRAM Since 1998, Florida has measured students’ knowledge and


understanding in areas of writing, reading, mathematics and science through the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Data obtained from FCAT scores are used to report education status and annual progress for individual students, schools, school districts and the state of Florida. The Florida Department of Education is continuing the transition from the FCAT to the FCAT 2.0 to align with new student academic content standards. The FCAT 2.0 measures student achievement of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS), which replaced the Sunshine State Standards in reading, mathematics, science and writing.


FCAT 2.0 Assessments:


Reading (grades 3-10) Mathematics (grades 3-8) Science (grades 5 and 8) Writing (grades 4, 8 and 10)


The Florida End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments are part of


Florida's Next Generation Strategic Plan for the purpose of increasing student achievement and improving college and career readiness. EOC Assessments are computer-based, criterion-referenced assessments that measure the NGSSS for specific courses, as outlined in their course descriptions. The first assessment to begin the transition to end-of-course testing in Florida was the 2011 Algebra 1 EOC Assessment. Biology 1 and Geometry EOC Assessments were administered for the first time in spring 2012. The U.S. History EOC Assessment was administered for the first time in spring 2013, and the Civics EOC Assessment will be administered for the first time in spring 2014.


To learn more about Florida’s assessment program, please


visit http://fcat.fldoe.org. To see the FCAT scores for Baker, Clay, Nassau and St. Johns public schools, please see the charts on pages 46, 48, 62 and 63.


HOME EDUCATION Homeschooling is a parent-directed education program that


allows a child to learn at their own pace in the comfort of their home. Parents who homeschool must comply with all the state statutes and regulations. Florida Statute 1002.41 requires that the district school superintendent is informed in writing that a child will be homeschooled 30 days prior to the intended start date. A parent must also keep a portfolio of records and materials, and provide an annual educational evaluation.


For more information, visit the website of the Florida Parent-


Educators Association, www.fpea.com or call 877-ASK-FPEA. CHARTER SCHOOLS Charter schools have been a choice in Florida’s public


education for more than a decade. These schools are publicly funded and were created to give parents and students more education choices. Some charter schools include themed learning approaches focusing on areas such as arts, sciences and technologies. Other charter schools provide services to special populations, such as students at risk of academic failure or students with disabilities.


Duval and St. Johns counties offer charter schools. Charter


schools are open to all students, but in Duval County, most of them target at-risk students. If you would like to learn more about the benefits of a charter school, please email charterschools@fldoe.org.


First Coast Relocation GuideTM 2013 45


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