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Neighborhoods From high rise condominiums on the Southbank, to


Victorian-era house-lined streets, the diversity of neighborhoods delights newcomers. If you are looking to live in a bustling city, at a relaxing beach, in the quaint suburbs, or even in a historically enriched neighborhood—the First Coast has you covered! Following is an overview of the area’s better- known residential areas, including descriptions of neighborhoods in Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau and St. Johns counties.


BAKER COUNTY {Glen St. Mary, Macclenny}


GLEN ST. MARY A small, rural town located in Baker County, Glen St. Mary


has a population of around 400 within the town's limits, with additional residents living in the surrounding areas. Glen St. Mary's small-town atmosphere attracts residents who want to escape the hustle and bustle of the city, but enjoy being able to commute to Jacksonville. Residents of Glen St. Mary can enjoy a stroll down the oak tree-lined Main Street or relax at Celebration Park, which features shady trees, a fountain and a gazebo. Glen St. Mary offers single-family homes, large properties and gated communities.


MACCLENNY The county seat of Baker County, Macclenny has a


population of around 6,000. Located 35 miles west of Jacksonville, Macclenny is known for its small-town charm and family traditions. The city hosts annual homecoming and Christmas parades in its downtown area. Housing options include a number of subdivisions that offer single-family homes and several apartment complexes. The Emily Taber Public Library, the only public library in Baker County, is located in the old Baker County Courthouse—the oldest public building in the county. Residents enjoy visiting the Baker County Heritage Park in Macclenny, where Florida’s oldest wood frame/log building, the Burnsed Blockhouse, is located.


CLAY COUNTY


{Fleming Island, Green Cove Springs, Keystone Heights, Middleburg, Orange Park, Penney Farms}


FLEMING ISLAND Located in the eastern part of Clay County, Fleming Island


is a community bordered by the St. Johns River, Doctors Lake and Black Creek. This thriving residential and commercial area has much to offer. Fleming Island has unique, planned neighborhoods that provide an abundance of centrally located amenities, some even within walking distance. Residents benefit from the multitude of retail stores and restaurants, as well as financial and business institutions in the community, eliminating the need to travel to nearby Orange Park. Additionally, Fleming Island is bursting with wildlife that can be explored from the many trails, paths and boat ramps located throughout the area.


GREEN COVE SPRINGS With its quaint, small-town appeal, Green Cove Springs is


an ideal place to live in Clay County. The city hosts the annual Memorial Day Riverfest and Christmas parade as well as other annual community events at its three parks. A number of older homes line the St. Johns River, and the city has seen the emergence of new housing developments within recent years. Green Cove Springs is the county seat and is widely known for its sulfur spring located in Spring Park, which is one of only about a dozen in Florida.


KEYSTONE HEIGHTS This small city is located in the southwest corner of Clay


County, with a section of the city lying partially in Bradford County. Keystone Heights contains numerous parks and sandbottom lakes, providing a picturesque landscape. The city has seen constant growth over the past decade due to its rustic appeal but has kept its small-town values. Many Keystone Heights residents commute to work in Gainesville, Jacksonville or other surrounding cities. The city is also home to many retirees. Local housing consists of single-family homes, lakeside homes and retirement communities.


First Coast Relocation GuideTM


2013


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