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Art Museums & Events One pleasant surprise you’ll find on the First Coast is the region’s vast and varied art scene. In addition to large galleries


that feature international, national and local artists, Northeast Florida is rich with intimate, privately owned galleries, museums and shops.


To sample the richly diverse offerings on the First Coast, visit one of the local monthly art walks. Fernandina Beach,


Jacksonville and St. Augustine provide an opportunity for art lovers to enjoy self-guided tours of more than 70 galleries. Art enthusiasts will delight at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Jacksonville. The museum works in conjunction


with the University of North Florida to bring modern works by the Masters to the community, as well as masterful works by regional artists.


Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, in Jacksonville’s historic Riverside, features world-class art from 2100 B.C. through


the 21st century. The museum’s permanent collection includes masterpieces by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, Peter Paul Rubens, Thomas Moran and Norman Rockwell.


No matter what your taste, the First Coast displays art you will appreciate. First Wednesday Art Walk


DUVAL COUNTY


{Atlantic Beach, Baldwin, Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach}


Alexander Brest Museum & Gallery


256-7371 Jacksonville University, 2800 University Blvd. N., Phillips Fine Arts Bldg., Jacksonville www.ju.edu/aboutju/pages/alexander-brest.aspx


This Jacksonville University facility houses an outstanding


collection of internationally acquired artifacts. Exhibits include a diverse collection of unique decorative arts in ceramics, porcelains, paintings, prints and sculpture. Artwork by faculty and students as well as local, regional, national and international artists is displayed in the Premier Gallery.


Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, The


356-6857 829 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville www.cummer.org


In 1903, Arthur Cummer established his home on the St.


Johns riverfront where the museum now stands. The formal gardens built around the home are worth the trip to the Cummer alone. The museum itself contains more than 5,500 works of art as well as Art Connections, a fun and educational activity center for children.


116


All Telephone Numbers in the First Coast Relocation GuideTM are in Area Code 904 Unless Otherwise Noted


First Coast Relocation GuideTM 2013


634-0303 www.downtownjacksonville.org/marketing/first_wednesday _artwalk.aspx


Join artists and art lovers on the first Wednesday evening


of each month for a free, self-guided tour. Enjoy free admission to the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in addition to more than 30 independent galleries along a mapped out downtown route. Downtown park, Hemming Plaza is the center of the action on this monthly venture.


Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) Jacksonville


366-6911 333 N. Laura St., Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org


Since its founding in 1924, MOCA Jacksonville has


promoted visual arts in the community. Today, the museum contains nearly 1,000 pieces in its permanent gallery from renowned artists worldwide. MOCA offers classes and promotes local artists by partnering with regional art institutes.


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