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In This Month … 14th July 1851


A burglary took place in Chiswick End and was reported in the Cambridge Chronicle newspaper on 9th August 1851: On the night of Monday, the 14th of July, about 12 o'clock, the dwelling-house of a poor man named William Carter, residing at Chiswick End, in the parish of Meldreth, was feloniously and burglariously entered. The entrance was effected by taking out the sash of a window at the back of the premises, the inmates being from home at a neighbouring farm- house, burning [sic] their daily bread. A quantity of men's wearing apparel, a watch and other articles, were stolen, to the amount of £4.


30th July 1926


The following report appeared in the Royston Crow in August 1926: The passing away of Mr John Reed, of Meldreth, at the ripe age of 87 years, on Friday 30th July, removes one of the oldest inhabitants of Meldreth. The deceased took to his bed just three weeks prior to the day of his death. He had been a wonderfully active man, and could be seen about the village every day, and he always had a cheery word for those he met, and a bright smile for all. He was for many years employed by Messrs. Adcock and Sons at the [Topcliffe] Mill, Meldreth, and was a very valued servant. He was one of the oldest members of the Baptist Chapel at Melbourn, joining as a member in the year 1859. He was a regular attendant up to 12 months ago, his last attendance being on the first Sunday in July of the present year.


John Reed, on a cart outside Topcliffe Mill. c. 1890


July 1964


Mr Harding sent a letter to all parents of children at the Primary School asking for their help in raising £250 towards the building of a swimming pool. (The pool recently re-opened after having been closed for three years.)


Kathryn Betts Meldreth Local History Group 41


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