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Medieval Pilgrim Badge Found in Meldreth


Understanding Our Past: Exploring the Hidden History of Meldreth Meldreth Local History Group’s latest project got underway last month when ten test pits were dug at various locations around the village. Over 50 volunteers were involved on each day. MLHG has received an Heritage Lottery Fund All Our Stories grant to finance the project, which it hopes will reveal information about how the village developed and evolved. Several of the pits were open to the public and many people took the opportunity to tour the pits and see what was being unearthed.


The most notable find was a medieval pilgrim’s badge (pictured on the facing page) which is currently undergoing conservation. Dr Carenza Lewis, who is working with the Group on the project said, "In nearly 1,500 pits that I’ve been involved in digging over the last few years, we’ve never found one of these before, so it’s a remarkable discovery." Reports from two of the volunteers who took part in June are included on the following pages and images from the weekend are being added to our website.


If you were unable to see any of the pits being dug in June, more pits will be dug on Saturday 6th and Sunday 7th July. Several of the pits will be open to the public, including those at Fieldgate Nurseries and Meldreth Primary School, together with pits elsewhere in the High Street and Whitecroft Road. Full details were not available at the time of going to press, but will be published on our website, www.meldrethhistory.org.uk. Alternatively, look out for the blue and white balloons around the village that denote a public pit. Pits will be open from approximately midday to 4.00pm on Saturday and from approximately 10.00am to 4.00pm on Sunday.


This is the second of three planned weekends of test pitting. The final test pits will be dug on Saturday 17th and Sunday 18th August.


Kathryn Betts


Meldreth Local History Group www.meldrethhistory.org.uk


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