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Inhibitor development


updated with growing knowledge on predictors of inhibitor development.


Conclusions


The immune response to FVIII is a highly complex and multifactorial process. Major progress has been made in the knowledge on non-genetic factors that modulate the risk of inhibitor development. However, more knowledge about the risk factors of inhibitor development is needed, for it is a condition for prediction and possibly even prevention of the development of inhibitors in patients with severe haemophilia A. If we are able to prevent inhibitor development, the morbidity of patients with haemophilia will be greatly improved. Moreover, inhibitors will then not hinder the cure of haemophilia by gene therapy. l


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