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TRAVEL


Aside from playing some of the great courses Oklahoma has to offer, take a break to visit the highly regarded Oklahoma City Museum of Art.


find yourself in Tulsa (OK), no amount of begging and groveling is too much if it gets you on Southern Hills Country Club, which was established in 1936. Perry Maxwell, who


designed the


Colonial and Prairie Dunes golf courses, was hired to design the Southern Hills course. The club now has 27 holes. In addition to the Championship Course, which has hosted three U.S. Opens and four PGA Championships, there is a third nine designed by Ben Crenshaw and Bill Coore that opened in 1992. Another


outstanding Oklahoma


Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa has hosted three U.S. Opens and four PGA Championships.


Hole 18 approach at Southern Hills Country Club, OK.


Oak Tree National in Edmond which was developed in 1981 by Joe Walser and Ernie Vossler.


course that is worth trying to get on is Oak Tree National (formerly Oak Tree Country Club) located in Edmond. The club was developed in 1981 by Joe Walser and Ernie Vossler. They hired famed golf course architect Pete Dye, who turned in some of his finest work with his two courses. In fact, Dye called them the finest inland courses he’s ever built. During the 1988 PGA Championship,


players faced a course with a USGA rating of 76.9 for its par of 71—the highest course rating in the country at that time. In 2002, the course was updated with redesigned greens, longer distances and additional tees, giving Oak Tree National a new course rating of 77.1. Factoring in Oklahoma’s notorious winds, the course presents an unmatched challenge to even the most serious of golfers. In 2008, Ed Evans and a group of


investors purchased Oak Tree from Don Mathis, who had owned and restored the Club since 1994. Dye returned to lead the project and the results have been impressive. Oak Tree Tour pros include Gil


« ONE OF THE JOYS OF GOLF IS TESTING YOURSELF ON


COURSES THAT HAVE HOSTED MAJOR OR NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS. »


www.pgatour.com


and a large saltmarsh. The fairway narrows as it rises some 40 feet towards the narrow green.


OKLAHOMA! One of the joys of golf is testing yourself on courses that have hosted major or national championships, and if you


Morgan, Bob Tway, Scott Verplank, Willie Wood, David Edwards, Doug Tewell and Mark Hayes. If you’d like to take a break from


golf, the highly regarded Oklahoma City Museum of Art is located just 17 miles away, as is the Western Heritage Museum. So there you have it, a wealth of truly


excellent reasons to leave home. Just don’t forget to bring your sticks. ■


PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2013 47


© PGA TOUR/STAN BADZ; GETTY IMAGES/KEVIN C. COX; DOMINICAN REPUBLIC MINISTRY OF TOURISM


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