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October 31- November 3


CHARLES SCHWAB CUP CHAMPIONSHIP


LET’S HEAR IT FOR TOM LEHMAN, who went two-for-two at last year’s season- ending Charles Schwab Cup Championship at Desert Mountain.


Lehman opened with rounds of 68-63-62 and led by a stroke going into the final round and then put on a brilliant display over the final stretch of holes, making birdies of four of the last five for a 65 and a six-stroke victory. “It was a great week from start to finish,” Lehman said. “I absolutely played some of my best golf of the year. I’m very, very fortunate and thankful to be able to kind of bring my best when I needed it.”


AN EMOTIONAL VICTORY FOR


LEHMAN Lehman’s win at Desert Mountain was particularly moving since it is the club where he worked with Jim Flick, the deeply respected professional who was Lehman’s coach and who was battling pancreatic cancer. “The more I thought about that, the more teary-eyed I would get,” said Lehman, who called Flick before his round. “I decided I can’t play this round of golf with tears in my eyes. I have to wait until business is finished.” Lehman’s 22-under-par 258 on the par-70 Cochise Course broke the Champions Tour record for the lowest numerical score in a 72-hole event. Jack Nicklaus set the previous record of 261 at par-72 Dearborn Country Club in Michigan in the 1990 Constellation SENIOR


PLAYERS Championship. With his victory, Lehman received a $1-million annuity in the Charles Schwab Cup points competition and earned $440,000 for the tournament win. The win was his second of the season and his seventh in 62 Champions Tour. He won five times on the PGA TOUR including the 1996 British Open. Lehman planned to use part of his Charles Schwab Cup annuity to help fund a junior foundation he plans to set up to honor Flick, who died on Nov. 5, the day after Lehman won. “It probably will involve a tournament, a junior tournament,” Lehman said. “If there is money needed to get it going, I’m sure this is


where it will come from.” ■


CHARLES SCHWAB CUP STANDINGS PLAYER


EVENTS POINTS Tom Lehman


Bernhard Langer Fred Couples


Roger Chapman Fred Funk


Michael Allen John Cook


Jay Don Blake


Mark Calcavecchia Jay Haas


www.pgatour.com


19 20 11 12 22 22 23 24 23 21


3,082 2,647 1,846 1,806 1,677 1,671 1,376 1,357 1,355 1,351


POINTS BEHIND


435


1,236 1,276 1,405 1,411 1,706 1,725 1,727 1,731


2 2 2 2 2 2


1 1 1


Course Insight TPC HARDING PARK


San Francisco’s TPC Harding Park offers two impressive courses that are open to the public. The


combined 18-hole Harding Park and WINS TOP 10


12 17 7 2 9


12 10 8


11 10


1


Tom Lehman became the first player to


win consecutive Charles Schwab Cups.


Fleming nine-hole courses are set amidst lush vegetation. TPC Harding Park has been named as the “13th best Municipal Golf Course in the United States,” as well as the “24th Best Course to Play in California,” by Golfweek Magazine. Golf Digest has also named it as “one of the Best Places to Play,” ranking it a 4.5 star golf course. TPC Harding Park has hosted the World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship in 2005, The Presidents Cup in 2009, and the Champions Tour’s Charles Schwab Cup Championship in both 2010 and 2011.


Tournament Record 258, Tom Lehman, 2012


Tournament 18-Hole Record 60, Jay Haas, 2012 (Desert Mountain)


GOLF CHANNEL


Ticket Information www.pgatour.com/tournaments/s539


PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2013 191


Tom Lehman during the 2012 Charles Schwab Cup Championship in Scottsdale, AZ.


TPC Harding Park (Par 71/7,135 yards) San Francisco, California


© GETTY IMAGES/CHRISTIAN PETERSEN


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