This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
August 16 - 18


DICK’S SPORTING GOODS OPEN


FOR WILLIE WOOD, victory was a long time coming. Wood, whose last victory came at the 1996 Deposit Guaranty Golf Classic on the PGA TOUR, picked up his first Champions Tour win by beating Michael Allen on the first hole of their playoff at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Open last year.


“It was quite exciting,” Wood said. “I hung in there, hung in there, and things turned out great.” Wood made the win exciting by making a 35-footer for birdie on the final hole of regulation play for a 68 to Allen’s 66. Allen had won twice earlier in the season. The playoff began and ended on the par-4 18th hole at En-Joie Golf Course—in fact, it was essentially over as soon as it began when Allen’s drive found a water hazard. All Wood needed to do was hang on for a par, which he did beautifully.


“I stood up and hit nice cuts there on the practice range and felt pretty good,” said Allen, who began the day seven strokes off the lead. “Actually, I really hit a nice solid shot, but I hit it dead straight with a slight pull and hit it in the water and I was kind of done then.” Local favorite Joey Sindelar (66), Kenny Perry (67), Tom Lehman (67) and Brad Faxon (71) finished one stroke out of the playoff. ■


Willie Wood after winning the 2012 Dick’s Sporting Goods Open at En-Joie Golf Course in Endicott, NY.


CHECK THIS OUT Course Insight


Willie Wood ended a victory drought of 16 years, 29 days since his lone triumph on the PGA TOUR at the 1996 Deposit Guaranty Classic in Mississippi. Prior to his Dick’s Sporting Goods Open victory, he had gone 189 PGA TOUR events, 105 Web.com Tour events and 15 Champions Tour events since last winning. Hale Irwin made his 394th appearance on the Champions Tour at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Open and the 1,053rd combined-career (PGA TOUR/Champions Tour) starts moved him into a tie for fourth place with Arnold Palmer on the all-time list. Miller Barber is the all-time leader among players with more than 1,000 combined- career starts, totaling 1,292 tournaments.


EN-JOIE GOLF COURSE


CHARLES SCHWAB CUP STANDINGS PLAYER


EVENTS POINTS Tom Lehman


Bernhard Langer Roger Chapman Fred Couples Michael Allen John Cook Fred Funk


Mark Calcavecchia Joe Daley


Kenny Perry www.pgatour.com


15 15 8 9


16 17 16 18 9


13


2,043 1,893 1,756 1,530 1,424 1,122 1,009 1,001 958 933


POINTS BEHIND


150 287 513 619 921


1,034 1,042 1,085 1,110


1 1 2 2 2


1 1 1 1


George Johnson was the owner of the Endicott- Johnson Shoe Company and by all accounts, a prince of a guy. He loved golf and thought his employees would love it, too, if they only had a chance to find out. In 1927 he built the En-Joie Golf Club. There would be no fancy pants architects. He hired Ed Moran, who drove a steam shovel at a local quarry, to build his course and he underwrote golf equipment and lessons for his employees. The club hosted what became known as the PGA TOUR’s B.C. Open for many years and the players enjoyed the course and the relaxed, friendly atmosphere. They still enjoy it today.


WINS TOP 10 9


13 2 6


10 7 6 9 2 7


Tournament Record 199, R.W. Eaks, 2007; Eduardo Romero, 2008


Tournament 18-Hole Record 62, R.W. Eaks, 2007


GOLF CHANNEL


Ticket Information www.dsgopen.com


PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2013 155


En-Joie Golf Course (Par 72/6,974 yards) Endicott, New York


© PGA TOUR/CHRIS CONDON


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196