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Cink in 2009), continued to dominate into the early 1980s. At that point, international players,


doubtlessly


With his victory, Ernie Els became the 16th different winner in the last 16 major championships. The last time 16 consecutive major championships were won by 16 different players was 1984-1987, starting at the 1984 Masters Tournament and ending with the 1987 PGA Championship.


Els snapped a streak of three-consecutive wins by Americans in majors.


He ended a string of nine consecutive first- time winners in major championships.


St. Andrews and then won in 1961 and `62. His world-wide popularity—plus international television coverage—helped restore the championship’s elevated standing in the game. Prior to Palmer, most top American professionals of that era avoided the Open because of the problems of travel and the meager purses. But Palmer changed all that and the locals loved him for it. Americans, led by Jack Nicklaus (three


wins), Lee Trevino (back-to-back wins in 1971 and 1972) and Tom Watson (five victories and a heartbreaking playoff loss to Stewart


PLAYER Ernie Els Adam Scott


Brandt Snedeker Tiger Woods Luke Donald


Graeme McDowell Nicolas Colsaerts Thomas Aiken


Miguel Angel Jimenez Geoff Ogilvy Ian Poulter


Alexander Noren Vijay Singh


Dustin Johnson Matt Kuchar


Mark Calcavecchia Thorbjorn Olesen Zach Johnson


www.pgatour.com


FINAL STANDINGS POS 1


2


1 2


T3 T3 T5 T5 T7 T7 T9 T9 T9 T9 T9 T9 T9 T9 T9 T9


67 64 66 67 70 67 65 68 71 72 71 71 70 73 69 71 69 65


70 67 64 67 68 69 77 68 69 68 69 71 72 68 67 68 66 74


following the lead


set by South Africa’s Player, stemmed the American domination.


THE INTERNATIONAL PLAYERS EMERGE Led by Spain’s Seve Ballesteros (three victories from 1979 to 1988) and England’s Nick Faldo (three wins from 1987 to 1992), the Open was won by Scotland’s Sandy Lyle and Paul Lawrie; Australia’s Greg Norman


CHARITY LINK Each year, The R&A distributes roughly five million pounds to deserving causes from grassroots initiatives, through coaching and regional championships, to professional tours all over the world. In addition, it provides advice on sustainable golf course management, along with the distribution of new green-keeping equipment to golf courses in developing golfing nations. In recent years, efforts have been focused on financing golf development in countries where the game is a relatively new sport, while assisting local projects like the Paul Lawrie Foundation in Aberdeen, Scotland.


(twice) and Ian-Baker Finch; Zimbabwe’s Nick Price; South Africa’s Ernie Els and Louis Oosthuizen and Ireland’s Padraig Harrington (twice). Of course, Americans won their fair share (Tiger Woods won three times), but the Open had once again solidified its reputation as the world championship of golf.


REMEMBER THIS? Anyone who doubts that golf can be a baffling—and sometimes cruel—game need only look back on last year’s British Open. With four holes left to play in the championship at Royal Lytham & St. Annes, it looked like Australia’s Adam Scott was a cinch to win his first major championship and that South Africa’s Ernie Els was on the glide path to another runner-up finish in his comeback journey. But Scott did the unthinkable, bogeying all four finishing holes while Els birdied the home hole for a 68 that gave him his second British Open title to go with his two U.S. Open victories. “Amazing,” said Els, who began the final round six strokes off the lead. “I’m still numb. It still hasn’t set in. It will probably take quite a few days because I haven’t been in this position for 10 years, obviously. So it’s just crazy, crazy, crazy getting here.”


3


68 68 73 70 71 67 72 71 73 73 73 69 68 68 72 69 71 66


4


68 75 74 73 69 75 65 72 67 67 67 69 70 71 72 72 74 75


TOTAL SCORE


273 274 277 277 278 278 279 279 280 280 280 280 280 280 280 280 280 280


FEDEXCUP POINTS


ELS WAS GRACIOUS IN VICTORY Still, being the consummate sportsman, Els was quick to commiserate with Scott. “First of all, I feel for Adam Scott,” Els said. “He’s a great friend of mine. Obviously, we both wanted to win very badly. But you know, that’s the nature of the beast. That’s why we’re out here. You win, you lose. It was my time for some reason.” Scott tried to put the best face on his loss. “I had it in my hands with four to go,” Scott said. “I managed to hit a poor shot on each of the closing four holes. Look, I played so beautifully for most of the week. I shouldn’t let this bring me down.” n


How Was It Won? Ernie Els won the British Open with a balanced game. Here are some numbers: n He ranked first in Greens in Regulation (57 of 72 or 79.2%). n He was 13th in Driving Distance (298.12 yards). n He tied for 43rd in Driving Accuracy (35 of 56 or 62.5%). n He tied for 60th in Sand Saves (2 for 6 or 33.33%).


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PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2013 127


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