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No. 15 put him a shot behind Johnson, who capped his bogey-free round with birdies on three of the last six holes. But to his credit, Matteson rallied with an eagle on the par-5 17th to help set up the playoff.


“It’s a heck of a way to play a qualifier, for four days,” Matteson said. “When I started this week I really didn’t think about the British Open. It’s fun to play (Rockford) and then go to Mississippi.”


The other big story of the week was Stricker’s bid to join Tom Morris Jr., Walter Hagen, Gene Sarazen and Tiger Woods, as the only players to win the same tournament four times in a row (Woods has done it twice). But Stricker’s bid fell apart when he drove into high grass on the 14th hole, took a drop, and made a bogey. He also bogeyed No. 15 and finished tied for fifth, four strokes out of the playoff. “It was fun trying to do it,” Stricker said of his run. “It was fun, but I think it came down to the putter. This week it was hot and cold.” ■


How Was It Won? Zach Johnson won the John Deere Classic with a strong performance on the greens. Here are some statistics: ■ He was second in Strokes Gained – Putting (8.551). ■ He ranked third in Total Putts (107). ■ He tied for 26th in Greens in Regulation (54 of 72). ■ He tied for 31st in Driving Accuracy (41 of 56). ■ He was 48th in Driving Distance (293.3 yards).


Powered by CHARITY LINK


The John Deere Classic raises funds for approximately 500 area charities through its work with Birdies for Charity. Having raised $6.79 million in 2012, the tournament is seeking to build upon that success and continue to grow its charitable impact on the community. Because John Deere pays for the program’s administrative costs, 100 percent of each donation goes to the donor’s designated charity. This year, all charities were promised a five percent bonus on pledges that Birdies for Charity collects for them, but will actually receive an eight percent bonus on their pledges. The Birdies for Charity Fund is the source of these bonus dollars. This fund is supported with dollars from tournament revenues, and with the support of corporations and individual donors through a Charity Partner program. These dollars will be distributed annually, and are designed not to compete with, but to enhance, the benefits for the 500 charities that participate in the program.


FINAL STANDINGS PLAYER


Zach Johnson Troy Matteson Scott Piercy John Senden Luke Guthrie Steve Stricker Scott Brown Chris DiMarco Billy Hurley III Lee Janzen Ryan Moore


Kevin Streelman www.pgatour.com POS 1 2 3 4


1 2 3 4


T5 T5 7


T8 T8 T8 T8 T8


68 65 61 68 65 69 69 64 65 68 65 67


66 66 67


65 69 65


67 67 71 66


70 66 66 66 67 68 68 67 65 67 69 68 69


68 64 71 66 68


64 70 67 69 70 67 68 65


TOTAL SCORE


264 264 266 267 268 268 269 270 270 270 270 270


FEDEXCUP POINTS


500.00 300.00 190.00 135.00


105.00 90.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00


3 With his


victory, Zach Johnson


moved to 3-0 in playoffs


on the PGA TOUR. His


previous two wins came at the 2007


AT&T Classic and 2009


Valero Texas Open.


Ticket Information www.johndeereclassic.com


PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2013 123


Course Insight TPC DEERE RUN


When the time came to pick an architect to design TPC Deere Run, the powers that be didn’t have to look far. They chose Illinois native D.A. Weibring, who had won the tournament three times and had a reputation for doing good, solid design work. Weibring had a beautiful piece of land to work with—it had rolling contours, beautiful stands of mature trees, and stunning views of the Rock River. Weibring and his design team took great pains to consider the feelings and suggestions of local environmentalists—who have showered the course with the same sort of praise that it has received from the players.


Tournament Record 258, Steve Stricker, 2010 (TPC Deere Run)


Tournament 18-Hole Record 59, Paul Goydos, 2010


GOLF CHANNEL • CBS


© GETTY IMAGES/MICHAEL COHEN


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