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June 27 - 30


CONSTELLATION SENIOR PLAYERS CHAMPIONSHIP


WHAT A LONG AND WINDING ROAD it’s been for Joe Daley.


Not so very long ago he had a nice, secure and comfortable job as a credit manager for a firm in Philadelphia, but he always had a dream of playing professional golf and, as is so often the case, those kinds of dreams die hard. So he tested himself on mini-tours in North Carolina and Florida, made it to the PGA TOUR in 1996 and ‘98, moved to what is now the Web.com Tour, where he won twice, and then played overseas in Bermuda, Jamaica, Panama, Morocco, Mexico, Chile, South Africa, South America and so on. You get the picture.


“Wherever there were tournaments, we’d


go play,” he said. “That’s what we did.” It all paid off at last year’s Constellation SENIOR PLAYERS Championship at Fox Chapel Golf Club, where Daley, then 51, won his first Champions Tour victory in a performance that saw him make more birdies (24) than anyone else in the field.


AN EMOTIONAL FINISH Daley needed to two-putt from 21 feet for the victory—no easy task under the best of conditions, but brutally difficult considering all the pressure he was under. He aimed at a spot two feet outside the left of the hole and watched as it trickled down towards the hole. “And then it fell in the right side of the hole,” Daley said. “It doesn’t get any better than that for me.”


CHECK THIS OUT


Joe Daley became the first non-exempt player to win a Champions Tour event since Rod Spittle open qualified and won the 2010 AT&T Championship in San Antonio.


Joe Daley joined an impressive list of former winners of this tournament, including seven members of the World Golf Hall of Fame. Arnold Palmer became the first when he claimed wins in 1984 and 1985. Chi Chi Rodriguez added a title to his resume in 1986, followed by Gary Player in 1987. Billy Casper became the fourth in 1988 and Jack Nicklaus the fifth in 1990. Raymond Floyd (1996, 2000) and Hale Irwin (1999) complete the list.


CHARLES SCHWAB CUP STANDINGS PLAYER


Tom Lehman Michael Allen


Bernhard Langer Joe Daley


Fred Couples


Mark Calcavecchia John Cook


Roger Chapman Kenny Perry Brad Bryant


www.pgatour.com


EVENTS 11


12 11 4 7


13 13 4


10 12


POINTS 1,522


1,266 1,115 958 898 844 789 756 719 662


256 407 564 624 678 733 766 803 860


2


1 1 1


1 1


Course Insight


FOX CHAPEL GOLF CLUB


POINTS BEHIND WINS TOP 10 1


6 9 9 2 5 6 4 1 5 8


Fox Chapel was designed by Seth Raynor, a Princeton grad, who began his career working with C.B. Macdonald. Among the courses Raynor worked on were Piping Rock Golf Club, Sleepy Hollow, The Greenbrier Golf Club (The Old White TPC) and the Mid-Ocean Club in Bermuda. Fox Chapel opened for play in 1923. The course is tree-lined and is known for its strategic bunkering. Indifferent shots will often run off the greens.


Tournament Record 261, Jack Nicklaus, 1990


Tournament 18-Hole Record 62, Olin Browne, 2012


GOLF CHANNEL


Ticket Information www.pgatour.com/tournaments/s507


PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2013 119


Fox Chapel Golf Club (Par 70/6,706 yards) Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


Joe Daley after winning the 2012 Constellation SENIOR PLAYERS Championship.


© PGA TOUR/CHRIS CONDON; GETTY IMAGES/HUNTER MAHAN


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