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June 6 - 9


REGIONS TRADITION


MINNESOTA native and former British Open champion Tom Lehman is particularly good in weather that would send a lesser player to the warm and cozy confines of the clubhouse.


The one exception is rain, which made


his victory in last year’s Regions Tradition all the more impressive. On a rainy, Alabama Sunday he went around Shoal Creek in 68 to win by two strokes over Bernhard Langer and Chien Soon Lu. It was his fourth round in the 60s for the week and it gave him his sixth Champions Tour title and allowed him to join Jack Nicklaus, Fred Funk and Gil Morgan as the only multiple winners of the tournament. He also became the first player to successfully defend his title in a Champions Tour major since Allen Doyle won both the 2005 and 2006 U.S. Senior Opens. “Today was a real test of perseverance, just trying to move the ball forward,” said Lehman. “Don’t try to bite off too much, don’t get too aggressive. Just play shots I know I can hit. “I don’t mind any condition other than rain,” Lehman added. “I don’t like playing in rain. It makes me really uncomfortable. I just feel like I lose the rhythm of my swing.” If the rain made him uncomfortable, the specter of Langer hovering near the lead couldn’t have been calming.


After Langer tied early in the round,


Tom Lehman after winning the 2012 Regions Tradition at Shoal Creek.


Lehman responded with a 30-footer for birdie on No. 7 and then made another birdie on 13 to take a two-stroke lead. He saved par with a good chip and a 12-footer on 14—a performance made all the more remarkable because it was done in heavy rains. “You don’t want to give shots back when you’ve kind of put it in your pocket,” Lehman said. “It really started pouring and that was a really difficult putt. To two-putt was a huge momentum keeper. That might have been the biggest putt of the day.”


After making a bogey on 17 he righted the ship with a par on the final hole for the win that earned praise from Langer. “My goal was to get off to a good start and put pressure on him, to make him win the tournament and not let him have a three-or- four-shot lead the whole day,” said Langer. “But he responded extremely well to it.” ■


CHARLES SCHWAB CUP STANDINGS PLAYER


Bernhard Langer Tom Lehman Michael Allen John Cook


Roger Chapman Fred Couples Jay Haas


Kenny Perry Fred Funk


Brad Bryant www.pgatour.com


EVENTS 11


10 10 11 2 6


11 9 9


10


POINTS 1,115


1,046 1,041 789 756 610 566 547 507 504


69 74


326 359 505 549 568 608 611


1 2


1 1 1 1 1


POINTS BEHIND WINS TOP 10 9


5 7 4 1 4 6 4 4 7


6 Tom Lehman


claimed his sixth career title on


the Champions Tour in his


53rd start. He won five titles on the PGA


TOUR, including the 1996


British Open, in 481 career appearances.


Tournament Record 265, Doug Tewell, 2001


Tournament 18-Hole Record 62, Brad Bryant, 2009; Tom Watson, 2003, Doug Tewell, 2001


GOLF CHANNEL


Ticket Information www.regionstradition.com


PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2013 105 Shoal Creek


(Par 72/7,197 yards) Birmingham, Alabama


Course Insight SHOAL CREEK


In 1974, when Jack Nicklaus arrived at the property that would become Shoal Creek, he told the owner, Hal Thompson, that the land was suitable for not one, but two courses. “We only want one course,” Thompson told


Nicklaus. “But we want it to be a superior one.” Which is just what he got. It has hosted two PGA Championships (Lee


Trevino in 1984 and Wayne Grady in 1990) and one U.S. Amateur (Buddy Alexander in 1986), as well as becoming the home of the Regions Tradition.


© PGA TOUR/CHRIS CONDON


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