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FEATURE SPICE BUSINES S RAVAL’S ART COMES HIGHLY RATED


A NUMBER of top chefs have recently praised the quality of the food at Raval in Newcastle’s Gateshead region. Benefitting from an ideal location next to the Hilton Hotel and Sage Gateshead Music Centre, Raval has been recommended for a Michelin Star by a number of experts and it has proved popular with celebrities, with Sir Cliff Richard and football legend Alan Shearer among those who have dined there and praised the food. Paul Gaynor, executive chef at the Lanesborough Hotel


in London, says,”Raval is a contemporary Indian restaurant with a lovely atmosphere and very friendly staff. As for the food itself, the freshness and flavours take it way beyond


what you would expect at most Indian restaurants. There is real technique and skill involved in the way Raval’s chefs combine complex spices to create dishes that are authentic but not overpowering.” Cyrus Todiwala, founder of


Cafe Spice Namaste, is also a fan. He comments,” My first meal at Raval certainly exceeded all expectations. It’s the sort of food I’ve been fighting to see served in the UK’s Indian restaurants for the past 20 years.” A number of newspaper critics


have also acclaimed the up- and-coming restaurant. The Guardian has reviewed Raval as “clearly pushing the boundaries of Indian cuisine into new and sophisticated areas with diverse and novel approaches to classical recipes,” while Marie Claire’s critic says,”Quality is the keynote of Raval’s dishes… the restaurant looks the part and delivers the real deal.”


Reflecting the artistry of its cuisine, Raval has recently been exhibiting the work of some of the North East’s most celebrated painters, following on from a special event to commemorate


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