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stole a horse worth two marks, wounding Thomas' man John”. He was also in Melbourn that same day. Perhaps the stolen horse was his means of transport to Melbourn and Meldreth.


What happened to these men? “Hanscach” (John de Hanscach) from Shudy Camps, evidently a man of substance, was beheaded; but John Staunford, Sadler, of London appeared in Cambridge on 2nd January 1382 and presented letters of pardon!


But the really surprising thing appears to be that the Monastic lands in south west Cambridgeshire, including the manor of the Prior of Ely in Meldreth, were effectively untouched. Funny thing that! But the Preceptories of the Order of the Knights of St. John (“the Hospitallers”) at Chippenham, Duxford and Shingay were attacked. A Robert de Hales was both Grand Master of the Order and High Treasurer (principal tax collector). Palmer and Saunders concluded, “It may be an open question whether the High Treasurer was not the hated person rather than that the Order claimed their (the rioters) animosity”. Locally it seems to have been personal.


(Most of the above is abstracted from “Documents relating to Cambridgeshire Villages” Palmer & Saunders 1926.)


Terry Lynch


In This Month … 27th June 1856


Hubert Oslar Shepherd Ellis (pictured right) was born.


21st June 1887


Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee was celebrated in Meldreth, when nearly 700 inhabitants of the village were treated to “a feast which was highly appreciated by all”.


3rd June 1890


An “Entertainment” was given in the Parish Room. The Royston Crow reported that: The names of Mrs Dalton Nash, Miss Clara Mortlock and Mr Gibbs are sufficient warrant for this statement, and the sweet voice of Miss Whittington bids fair to make her one of the favourite songstresses of the neighbourhood. Mr Gibbs was in splendid form and


5 cont...


Hubert was a local celebrity and controversial figure who played an active role in many local organisations.


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