This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Meldreth WI


At our last meeting we discussed the yearly resolution the WI has put to all its members. Everyone is concerned about the number of High Street shops closing. Online shopping and parking charges have quite a lot to do with it and some of the smaller shops and even the bigger ones just cannot keep going. The rental keeps on the up and up as do the parking costs. We, in Meldreth and Melbourn, are very lucky that we can purchase fresh fruit, vegetables and meat locally. If we want to keep our local shops open the answer is to BUY LOCALLY!


Future events were mentioned. Our outing this year is to the Gordon Boswell Romany Museum and there are some lunches and day schools of interest. Prior to the Wimbledon tennis tournament, I am going on a conducted tour of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Club. It is many years since I was there so I will see big changes.


Our speaker, Margaret Hayes, is a Blue Badge guide and the title of her talk was “Haunted Ely”. I didn't realise there were so many ghosts in the area: Oliver Cromwell has a lot to answer for! We heard about mysterious cats and dogs appearing, and of course there was “A lady in Blue”, well modelled by Mary Symonds. There are quiet ghosts and very noisy ones and in the old vicarage children could be heard laughing or crying but no children could be seen. It was all very interesting


Next month's speaker is Bev Biggs who will be telling us about her life as a personal shopper. She is a very entertaining speaker so do come along and join us; you will be made most welcome.


Kathleen Thompson


For more information on the WI and over 30 other local clubs, please visit www.meldrethhistory.org.uk 54


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68