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www.ensolv-europe.com When the pressure is on, EnSolv®


5408 critical cleaning makes the difference


critical cleaning of oxygen systems


no stress cracking or embrittlement of titanium components


engine management and information systems


bonding composite panels and fixings hydraulics for landing gear


biocidal cleaning of fuel systems


Take off – the ultimate test for all components and fabrications.


EnSolv 5408 vapour degreasing solvent is the drop-in replacement for the carcinogen trichloroethylene. It can be used in any modern cleaning machine designed for solvents, and sets the benchmark for soil removal.


As the only nPB based vapour degreasing solvent approved by Boeing for military and civil aircraft, EnSolv 5408 is also approved by the major gas suppliers and is used by NASA and Air Force maintenance facilities for oxygen line cleaning.


EnSolv 5408 can be used with all metals and is tested and approved to clean titanium without embrittlement, as well as being compatible with most plastics and elastomers, carbon fibre and other composites.


EnSolv 5408 kills and slows recolonisation of microbial growth in fuel systems. The high Specific Gravity suspends contamination and leaves no surface residues.


EnSolv IONIC is an excellent cleaner, removing flux and other contaminants from circuits and connectors in engine management controls and information systems.


Enviro Tech Europe Ltd Bermuda House, High Street, Hampton Wick, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey KT1 4EH, United Kingdom Tel +44 (0)208 281 6370 • Fax +44 (0)208 502 3531 • Email info@ensolv-europe.com • Website www.ensolv-europe.com


The environmentally-friendly vapour degreasing solvent for all applications


Our specialist distributors throughout Europe can advise on applications and equipment with ongoing training for operators and information on regulatory changes.


Contact us for more information about the successful use of EnSolv in your industry.


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