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PRIVATE CLUB FEATURE


The Dominion Club


A Perfect Family Escape in the Neighborhood


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et’s face it, the private country club model has not exactly been knocking it out of the ball park the past five years. Clubs around town struggle to maintain membership rosters as longtime loyal members have been forced to scale back. Meanwhile potential new members have held off on joining private facilities until times become a little more stable.


One private club that has dodged the membership exodus is The Dominion Club, located in the far West End of Richmond in the community of Wyndham. The Do- minion Club has not only retained most of their members through the rough economic times, they’ve actually added a significant amount of new members in the last few years.


Over 70 new members joined The Dominion Club in 2012 while the club also recorded the least amount of resignations in its his- tory. Members love the freedom from assessments, absence of extra dues for dependents or purchase of stock. TDC is doing so well that


18 Virginia Golf Report • Spring 2013


initiation fees have even started to slowly rise back to where they were when times were rolling. Only 31 golf memberships are still available in 2013.


How has TDC been able to buck the national trend?


“Family, family, family,” says Dominion Club membership ex- ecutive Maggy Magee, in explain- ing the positive upward trend in membership numbers. “We focus on making The Dominion Club a place where families know they can come, have fun and relax in a secure setting. It’s what we’ve worked so hard to maintain, even in these times of economic dis- tress.”


Many private clubs preach the family theme but often can’t pull it off because of the overall age disparity of members. That’s not a problem at The Dominion Club.


“Our average membership age continues to stay somewhere in the range of 45 to 48,” says Magee, who has been a membership consultant at 19 other clubs before joining TDC in 2008. “It’s a youth-


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ful private club where members and their guests feel comfortable and at home. The club provides an opportunity for families to create memories and offers an environ- ment that encourages families to come together and also to hang out with other families and friends.”


Over 100 sports and social events


fill TDC’s yearly calendar. There is a camp-out on the driving range; a book and author luncheon; movie nights at the pool; cooking classes; a father-daughter dance; and the enormously popular Annual Mem- ber Celebration that takes place in May on the lawn and includes mu- sic, inflatables for the kids, games and food stations. In the fall, the annual Wine Festival spills out over the lakeside lawn with food and wine pairings and the chance for adult members to spend time with one another.


“Some of the activities are yearly favorites for families,” says Ma- gee. “But we are always striving to develop new events that we think will be fun for members to


experience.” Menu selections con-


tinue to evidence the use of local ingredients and entice members to enjoy seasonal specialties.


When the weather warms up The Dominion Club is able to showcase its incredible outdoor facilities which are highlighted by the championship Bill Love-Cur- tis Strange designed golf course. The Dominion Club enjoyed a 14 year run as the host course for the current Web.com Tour which was also known as the Nike Tour, Buy. Com Tour and Nationwide Tour in the past.


Director of Golf T.W. Pulliam describes the course as “very fun, playable and challenging.” It’s known around town as being one of the finest conditioned courses in the Middle Atlantic region that offers a variety of holes including a few risk-reward holes that always make the round enjoyable.


Pulliam, who has been at The Dominion Club for over ten years, has developed a very strong junior program which has included many players who have gone on to play high school and college golf. Every


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