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Tis Year Eat Local


by John Crooke S


pring is in the air, bluebirds are nesting and daffodils are faithfully blooming once again. It’s that time


of year when many of us look forward to the first fruits of the season—red rad- ishes, fresh asparagus and sweet straw- berries. To get the most out of nature’s bounty this year, consider our local options. Eating locally is a wonderful way to reduce our carbon footprint, enjoy a seasonal diet and foster com- munity. Following is a list of four ways to eat locally.


Grow Vegetables in a Garden. This is perhaps the most fun and satisfy- ing way to consume local produce. After all, we can’t get much more local than our own backyard. For those with no prior experience, make the gar- den an opportunity to read up on the subject and talk to people who have gardening experience. Individuals will enjoy the conversations and revelations, but mostly they will relish eating carrots and lettuce they’ve grown themselves.


Join a Community Supported


Agriculture (CSA) Farm. In a CSA farm, members pledge their support for their farm at the beginning of the season and then come to the farm each week throughout the season


16 Somerset/Middlesex/Hunterdon Co. Edition NaturalAwakeningsCNJ.com


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