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Somewhere along the journey of the PR juggernaut that ascended three girls from Watford to headline touring status, something seems to have been forgotten. Bewitched by the alchemy that their three harmonised voices procure, those in charge of Te Staves lost sight of the fact that the girls – whilst worthy of support slots with Bon Iver, and Tom Jones, were not heaven-sent nymphs, or celestial bursts of sound – these are real girls, with their own sisterly humour, genuine and entertaining. Although as soon as you press play on the album again, you see how hard that was to convey, can it be true that such a sound comes out of… Watford?


packing for SXSW. I have just gone and bought lots of miniature deodorants and shampoos and all those things, which is the most fun part of packing to go anywhere, I think. Just having miniatures, it’s the best feeling!


W


I know what you mean; I never even wear nail varnish but I feel the need to buy nail varnish remover if I see a mini one, just for that very reason. [LAUGHS] Completely! I’m completely the same; all this stuff I don’t need. Oh dear…


You’ve been to SXSW before Emily – is it as amazing as it always sounds? It is, but it’s bloody hard work, I have to say. It’s really like, chaos; the whole city is full of people and everyone’s carrying guitars and trying to shift gear around, so it can be really intense, but it’s really good fun as well. Tere’s great beer, great BBQ, Mexican food and music everywhere, everyone’s in party mode; you can’t move for music, there’s just music everywhere.


I was wondering whether some of your songs feel at home in the States, because you’ve definitely got a sympathy towards US musical heritage, in terms of music. Do the songs settle in well to the environment over there? Because so much amazing music has come out of there - obviously it’s influenced our writing. So I guess yeah, some of it might come across as


14 /April 2013/ outlineonline.co.uk


e very much appreciate your time today, especially as you must be right in the middle of


an easy fit for America. People tend to associate harmonies very strongly with country music, or Americana at least, thinking from the 60s and 70s at least, with the Eagles and that kind of stuff.


You must settle in nicely, but you are obviously British girls – however, your songs don’t seem to fit the imagined landscape of urban Watford, or am I completely wrong there? Have I got the completely wrong impression of Watford? [LAUGHS] Well actually I’m in Watford town centre at the moment and it’s beautiful… no, no, it’s definitely not beautiful! I don’t know, it’s a strange thing - where you come from – we’re just normal people; we didn’t grow up on a farm, singing on the porch or anything like that! But there is actually quite a creative scene here, I mean, I don’t know if you’ve heard of Daughter? We went to school with her, and Kyla La Grange, we went to school with her and Young Husband – so there’s quite a lot of music going on, and theatre and things like that as well, although you wouldn’t know it to walk through Watford.


You’re coming to in Norwich this


April, the Norwich Arts Centre, which you’ve played at before, I think – - Tat’s right, yeah. Tat was our first ever tour and I remember the venue; it was beautiful – we had a really good show there. Te acoustics are amazing; I remember we barely used the mics at all, we backed way off and for the room, it’s lovely.


Do you remember much of that show, or that tour? I imagine it seems like a distant memory nowadays. God, it really does, yeah. I guess I remember snippets of it, but last year was such a haze of touring; I think we did 6 or 7 maybe. But I think the first one, we’ll always remember it. We were just sort of shoved into our mate’s car [laughs]… with nothing and we really didn’t know what we were doing, but it was great fun.


So those early tours, are they learning curves or is touring something that comes instinctively to a musician? Well, I think that you definitely learn as you go. You learn that you can’t get hammered every night if you want to be at your best on the last show as well as you were on your first show, so you definitely learn to pace yourself – that’s definitely something that we learnt, although I wouldn’t say that


We’re just normal people; we didn’t grow up on a farm, singing on the porch or anything like that!


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