This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TWO OUT OF THREE AIN’T BAD


STEP board member George Lyall is both a lawyer and an accountant. He’s not yet a doctor, but there is still time, he tells Sally Percy


AS A YOUNG BOY growing up in Edinburgh, George Lyall was advised by his mother that he should become a doctor, a lawyer or an accountant. But Lyall himself had greater ambitions: he set himself the goal of becoming both a lawyer and an accountant by the age of 30. He missed achieving that goal by a whisker – one month after his 30th birthday he was qualifi ed in both professions. ‘It was the only life goal I’ve ever set, and I’ve avoided setting such goals ever since,’ he explains, cheerfully. Although Lyall fi rst trained as a Scottish solicitor, he had always enjoyed fi gures – a trait that he admits


is ‘rare for a lawyer’. So, after qualifying, he became a tax assistant in the private client tax team of Arthur Young, McClelland, Moores & Co, a predecessor fi rm of Ernst & Young. There he began training as a chartered accountant (in case you’re wondering, he found the accountancy exams harder than the law exams). ‘I did that to make myself recession-proof,’ he reveals, adding: ‘So far, so good.’ Lyall stayed with Arthur Young in Edinburgh for nine years, but after it merged with Ernst & Whinney, the fi rm began to review its approach to preparing personal tax returns. Sensing that might not bode well for his own future, Lyall decided to look around for other opportunities. He returned to law, as head of the private client tax team at Newcastle fi rm Dickinson Dees in 1994. A year later, he also qualifi ed as an English solicitor and vowed that would be the last professional exam he ever sat. He was made a partner at Dickinson Dees in 1997 and now specialises in the taxation of private individuals, family companies, partnerships, charities and private trusts.


Signing up It was through Dickinson Dees that Lyall was introduced to STEP: the North East and Cumbria branch of the Society met in the fi rm’s offi ces. He joined the branch and quickly became heavily involved in the organisation, serving as an ordinary committee member, programme committee director and branch chair. He also sat on the STEP worldwide council for several years. In 2003, the STEP Council was reduced from 40 members to 24 and Lyall stepped down. But following the creation of a regional structure for the organisation, he joined the regional committee for England and Wales, serving as both deputy and chair. In 2008, Lyall returned to Council after he


was appointed as the member for the England and Wales region. Council elected him to STEP’s board of directors in 2010, a responsibility he still holds, as a member without portfolio. ‘I suppose it makes me a bit of a troubleshooter, so I get a few challenges from time to time,’ he says. He’s also involved with STEP’s Philanthropy Advisors Special Interest Group, liaises with the education team and sits on the Society’s staff remuneration committee. As you’d expect from someone with such a long association with the Society, Lyall is proud of STEP.


22 APRIL 2013 WWW.STEPJOURNAL.ORG


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84