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or flowers like cosmos, sweet peas and zinnias. Joy says interest in open-pollinated and heirloom seeds is becoming more common, and as this trend becomes more ingrained in the gardening cul- ture, gardeners are getting adventurous with unusual crops like New Zealand spinach, ground cherries, black-eyed


peas and heirloom sweet potatoes. “There’s a never-ending supply of color- ful, fun and flavorful open-pollinated vegetables out there, and growing new things can get quite addicting,” Joy adds. She catalogs her own heirloom tomato obsession on Pinterest (Pinter- est.com/TheYarden/Tomatoes-Im-Grow- ing-2013).


even in spring, as the last few seasons have been very dry,” saysWesterfeld. If April and May are dry, be sure to break out the hoses early enough and con- sider using drip hoses to keep trees and shrubs properly hydrated.


Select and Plant the Seeds


Plan to place all but the hardiest cold- weather vegetables in the garden after the last frost, which is about typically in mid- to late-May in the Chicago area (ISWS.Illinois.edu/atmos/statecli/Frost/ frost.htm). Westerfeld recommends starting seeds indoors in early April for such veggies as ornamental basil, kale, cabbage, chard, broccoli and tomatoes,


We'll plan, grow and maintain a bountiful organic garden for you, so your child can pick fresh, tasty and healthy food from it everyday.


SMART GARDENER smartbackyard.com (847) 497 0181 info@smartbackyard.com


natural awakenings


April 2013


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