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Chinese people are keen on cuisine; they are fond of eating and know how to eat well. What’s more, Chinese people are now eating for wellness. By Anne Zhou


Eat for Wellness B


Matsutake Soup


nese culture and it is an indispensable part of Chinese daily life. In their everyday life, Chinese people never stop their pursuit of delicacies. They are looking for answers to such questions as: what ingredients can provide an ideal taste, what method of cooking will bring out the origi- nal taste of the ingredients, what kind of spices need to be used to ensure the authentic taste of the dishes, what kind of dishes are good for eat- ing in different seasons…Chinese people show great patience while choosing ingredients, cook- ing methods and even containers. In Ya She Tan Chi, a book written by Liang Shih-chiu (a renowned educator, writer, translator, literary theorist and lexicographer in Chinese history), you will find how persistent and enthusiastic Chinese people are when it comes to food. Liang made detailed descriptions of plenty of Chinese dishes in his book, which is both interesting and alluring. Readers who know nothing about Chi- nese cuisine will be touched by Chinese people’s affection for food. How to eat healthy, this is something that all Chinese people want to master. Considering the


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s an old Chinese saying goes, food is the first necessity of people. Food plays an important role in traditional Chi-


fact that wellness is a very popular concept in China, Chinese people are now eating for well- ness. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), it is advised to pursue balance in our bodies and in our minds by eating a variety of foods to maintain health. No single ingredient or kind of ingredient is vilified or consumed to excess. As one Chinese proverb says, “Sour, sweet, bitter, pungent: all must be tasted.”Particular foods are thought to counteract an individual’s personal tendency towards, say, restlessness or fatigue, and different choices are recommended for dif- ferent seasons. In the interest of balance, TCM advises people who tend towards “cold” to grav- itate towards “warm” foods and spices. This refers not only to the food's physical tempera- ture, but also to its effects on the body (think of breaking a sweat when you eat a curry). On the warmer end of the spectrum are foods and herbs such as ginger, chili peppers, cinnamon, turmeric, nutmeg, green onions, and walnuts. Warm foods are also especially appropriate in the winter or an unusually cold day. Similarly, people who tend towards “hot” or who are in a hot environment are advised to consume more cool foods. Eating to be healthy, this concept brings


innovation to Chinese dishes. To meet consum- ers’ wellness requests, a lot of restaurants in China make their efforts to create new dishes focusing on wellness effect. Some of these new wellness dishes are suitable for eating all year round and some of them are created especial- ly for certain season. Without using precious ingredients or complicated cooking procedures, its authentic taste, interesting appearance and nutritious effect make the dishes attractive to customers. For example, many restaurants like to launch seasonal dishes using mutton as the main ingredient due to the warm nature of mut- ton. There are also a few restaurants that pay attention not only to the wellness effect of dishes but also to innovation, making dishes worth try- ing. Nourishing Teapot Soup prepared by Bril- liant Resort & Spa is one such dish. Using nutri- tious ingredients such as mushrooms, squab meat and fish maw, the dish will no doubt bring you rich taste and healthy effects.


rilliant Resort & Spa pays great atten- tion to studying local foods and advo-


cates the localization of cuisine. The Restau- rant at Brilliant Resort & Spa carefully selects the best unique local ingredients. Each dish reflects ancient Oriental wellness philosophy in pursuing balance in diet. So both the cook- ing techniques and presentation of the dishes meet international standards. Brilliant Resort & Spa wellness service can customize menus for guests based on their preferences, body constitution and needs. Bob Wu, Deputy Head Chef of Brilliant


Resort & Spa, Chongqing. He graduated from Frederick Institute of Technology Cyprus (Master of Business) and once worked in the Main Chinese Restaurant Cyprus at Four Sea- son Hotel Nicosia Cyprus, Sheraton Shenyang Lido Hotel, etc.


Nourishing Teapot Soup Kilocalories: 156kcal


Ingredients Instructions


Chicken Soup: 150g, Flower Mushroom: 5g Squab Meat: 20g, Fish Maw: 5g, Ginger: 3g Ham: 3g, Dried Scallop: 5g


1. cut the squab meat into small pieces, blanching the meat and putting into cool water;


2. put the mushroom, dried scallops, ginger, sliced ham and squab meat into the teapot;


3. after pouring the chicken soup into the teapot, steam in the steamer for 3 hours;


4. add fish maw into the teapot. Nutritional Ingredients


Squab Meat is tender, moist and richer in taste than many commonly-consumed poultry meats, it is rich in proteins, minerals, and vitamins.


Fish Maw is rich in collagen, various vitamins and mineral nutrients such as calcium, iron, zinc, etc. Dried Scallop’s taste is rich and umami due


to its high content of various free amino acids, such as glycine, alanine, and glutamic acid. It is also rich in nucleic acids such as inosinic acid, amino acid byproducts such as taurine, and minerals, such as calcium and zinc.


SpaChina • 2013 | 83


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