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周芸 编译 The Rewards of Retailing


The benefits of retailing products in spas include extending client retention, increasing income, improving space and time efficiency, helping to last longer the results of the treatments and potentially improving clients’ visit frequency. Lisa M. Starr writes


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lients visit your spa for many reasons, which may include a specific issue with their skin, to receive treatment


for a body ache, or simply for relaxation and enjoyment, a break from daily cares. But with the average spa visit lasting two hours or less, the relief provided has a short duration. One of the most effective ways for clients to extend the benefits of their spa visit beyond their time in the spa is to send them home with a useful memento of their visit, a retail product. Whether it is a product that addresses a


physical concern, such as a skincare cream, or something that connects them mentally or emo- tionally to their visit, such as an aromatherapy candle, every time the client uses the product, they are connected once again to their visit to the spa and the benefits they received. This valu- able association provides another tool to help to build client retention and loyalty. But the ben- efits of retailing products extend beyond client retention. Some of the additional advantages for


a spa business are outlined below: Secondary Income – Retailing can become


a second revenue stream that augments your service income, and is not directly dependent on the presence or skills of beauty therapists. In the U.S., retail sales average 11% of the total revenue of a spa (2012 survey by Inter- national Spa Association), but the ratio can be as high as 30%. Your retailing ratio is related to the type of service sale turnover that you produce; skincare and cosmetics are the serv- ices that produce the highest retail to service ratio, and massage is the lowest. So in general, skincare-focused spas will produce higher retail turnover, and the more massages or other spa services you perform, the lower your retail ratio will be. Space & Time Efficiency – Retail revenue


can be created in far less space and in less time than a spa treatment. Let’s imagine a typi- cal spa treatment room of 10m². If your spa is open for 10 hours a day and you have a 60% utilization rate, with your basic facial service costing RMB530, you would generate RMB3180. However if you have a dedicated retail area, you might have a 2 meter wide space with shelving and products, and over a 10-hour period that same space could probably generate twice as much as the treatment room. The labor costs on retail sales are much lower, however the cost of goods is much higher, so the profit margin could end up being be simi- lar, but the retail turnover can equal or even exceed your treatment turnover. Quality Management – Many clients are


still new to spa-going and caring for their skin and bodies, and may not have the same quality


Lisa Starr


美国著名水疗咨询公司Wynne商务的资深商务咨询顾问,涉足美 容和水疗行业近30年。 Lisa Starr has almost 30 years of experience in the beauty indus- try, and is currently the senior East Coast business consultant to new and existing spas and salons for Wynne Business.


SpaChina • 2013 | 55


of products at home that you use in the spa. They’ll enjoy their service with you, and they will look and feel great when they leave the spa, but what happens the next day when they use their own products which are not of the same quality? Their skin will not feel as nice, since their homecare product regimen will influ- ence their condition much more than the hour or two they spend in your spa. Sending your clients home with quality products helps to insure that the results of the services and treat- ments they received from your spa last longer, and increases the value of the treatments them- selves in the client’s eyes. Visit Frequency – A further method to


increase revenue is to increase the number of visits a client makes to your facility. If you have a client who comes every six weeks for a skin- care treatment, you will see her 8.6 times in a year. But if you have an enticing retail area and a nice array of products for her to browse and purchase, she may stop by additional times for refills or even for gifts. And who knows, maybe when she stops by to pick up a retail product she will also get a manicure, or find time to have a consultation on a new service. Having made the case for retailing of spa


products, it should also be said that retailing is itself an industry, with best practices and standards that are separate from spa opera- tions. Choosing brands and products can be a confusing undertaking. The best retailers pay attention to things like lighting, visual mer- chandising and props to create inviting shop- ping environments. Just putting a few shelves onto a wall does not make you a “retailer,” but it’s a start, and I encourage you to get started!


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