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HOMESTYLES LANDSCAPES


Springscaping L


ANDSCAPE PROJECTS ARE mainstay of spring and summertime here in the Inland Northwest, but while we head to work out in the yard each year we oſten skip the one key


step that helps best ensure you and your yard get the most from your sweat and dollar: the plan. Tink of your landscape plan as an investment


portfolio, suggests Nick Hamad, landscape designer with Land Expressions. It may sound odd, but think about it: You wouldn’t go out and invest in any old investment without first thinking about your long-term investment goals. In the same manner, consider your landscape plan a “summary prospectus” or inventory of your personal landscape goals. Te plan can take many forms, from a simple list to the full plan set you might expect from a local professional. When working with homeowners,


Land


Expressions advises an approach that maximizes the versatility and function in outdoor living. For instance, flexibility can be improved by having a fireplace, furnishings and a barbeque/counter area that can be moved from one area to another. “A family is beter served throughout the


changing seasons,” says Hamad, “by being able to adjust their outdoor living space for cool breezes in spring, heat of summer and can even extend their outdoor activities into winter through what is called ‘programming” of space and amenities’.” Remodeling an existing landscape can be a lot of


fun and give a “new look” to your home. Furthermore, says Tom Musselwhite, owner/


landscape designer of Pacific Garden Design, it can enhance the value, functionality and enjoyment of your property. Te design process is similar whether it’s a new landscape or a remodel. It’s important to


88 SPOKANE CDA • March • 2013


balance the location and site atributes, architectural style, budget and your lifestyle. Consider whether your home is in a rural or urban seting and how it relates to its surroundings. Are there existing unique features you can work with? What is the architectural style of the home and does that style have an associated landscape style that might guide your decisions? Are you planning to stay in your home for 5, 10 or 20 years or remodeling for resale? Do these changes reduce the maintenance or add to it? Can I phase the project to include all the items that I really want in the landscape? Careful consideration of all these factors will help you to achieve a successful project. A professional landscape designer will also help to creatively and effectively work through this process. An easy way to add curb appeal to a home


is by lining the front with a functional and decorative fence. Beautifully craſted fences are great for keeping out unwanted visitors while keeping children and pets in without hiding the house. A well-chosen fence adds character to your home. Such boundaries also create an unfounded sense of security. “If you don’t define your property, you


risk having your neighbor define it for you,” says Austin Wells, owner of North 40 Fence. Modern fencing comes in many


materials, each of which has a different feel and appearance. Wooden fences, for example, create a rustic ambiance. When fashioned from cedar, this type of fence lasts upward of 50 years. Wooden fences can also be painted or stained a natural


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WITH WARMER DAYS AHEAD, IT’S TIME TO PULL OUT THE IDEAS, TOOLS AND DREAMS FOR CREATING A YARD YOU WILL LOVE by Tanya Madden


photo courtesy of Land Expressions


color. Simply leting a wooden fence turn gray from natural weathering adds rustic charm. If security is your goal, but chain link is too industrial, ornamental steel and aluminum fences come in a wide variety of styles and can be customized with rings, ball tops, finials and scrolls for added beauty. “Ornamental steel and aluminum gives the


appeal of antique wrought iron,” Wells says. “A well-built cedar fence with superior materials takes you back in time, and particularly matches the character of bungalow and craſtsman style homes.” “People say all the time, ‘It’s just a fence. . .


‘ It’s more than just protection for kids and pets,” Wells adds. “Te idea is to compliment your home. It’s the ‘trim work’ on your artistic design.” Reactivation, inspection, tuneup, evaluation,


system turn-on—no mater what terminology is used, irrigation systems need to be evaluated each spring for proper operation and condition. Tis process “should be” fairly simple, with


the water being re-introduced to the system and each component visually inspected for damage or wear and either repaired or replaced only as necessary. According to Kenneth Keast, of All Northwest Landscaping, 70 percent of the homes the company visits each season have broken sprinkler heads in the system. “Over the winter, your sprinkler heads will


actually freeze,”Keast says. “Before you start watering, you want to make sure that they are all working correctly, that the watering patern is correct and that you’re geting the right amount of water to evenly cover the grass.” Among the most common problem are clogged filters, which prevent correct water


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