This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
METRO TALK RECYLCING


from the precious metals like gold, platinum, silver. It’s big business, and states like Washington are making e-waste a number one issue around who pays for all that planned obsolescence. In Recycled Cell Phones—A Treasure Trove of Valuable


Metals, the U.S. Geological Service reported “about 130 million cell phones are retired annually in the United States (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2005). Collectively, these cell phones weigh about 14,000 metric tons...annually retired cell phones contain almost 2,100 metric tons of copper, 46 metric tons of silver, 3.9 metric tons of gold, 2 metric tons of palladium, and 0.04 metric ton of platinum.” The U.S. relies on almost 100 percent imported rare earth


metals, so some might see that recycling-reclaiming is of national security interest. Terms like “upcycling” and “downcycling” have helped to


express exactly where our seven billion global citizens have come in the past 12,000 years as we’ve ended up becoming not only “consumers” to the marketers, but called “oil eat- ers” by sociologists and hard scientists who are looking at


our insatiable appetite for products, stuff, junk, things, hob- bies, food, housing and environments, all tied to what was relatively cheap oil for almost 70 years. We are now considering the implications of the saying,


“You are what you eat.” Part of that farm-to-fork formula is tied to all the petroleum products used to plant, germinate, grow, harvest, move, process, further refine, package and then transport the countless items to that super store up on Division or out in the Valley. Now we have to get there and bring that “stuff” back home. It requires something like 12 calories of energy – petro-


leum-based – to deliver one calorie of nutrition – or even empty nutrition – to us. That’s about 25 million barrels a day of oil we consume. What’s the other side of all of that consumer ecstasy


consumption? Garbage. The so-called waste-steam. Refuse. Now Spokane has been in a four-month experiment of a much more simplified production of getting all of that stuff we throw away into a recycling stream.


upcycle: the process of converting waste materials or use-


less products into new materials or products of better qual- ity or for better environmental value downcycle: the process of converting materials and prod-


ucts into new materials of lesser quality Waste as a Commodity “It’s already a commonly held philosophy in the United


States, but by the time you ‘regard waste a resource,’ it’s too late,” says Suzanne Tresko, Recycling Coordinator for Spokane Regional Solid Waste System. “The Earth’s resources have already been extracted – even if you do recycle the material. To truly preserve the Earth’s resources, you have to stop consuming the Earth’s resources. Recycling that plastic bottle is good, but not extracting the Earth’s resources to create that plastic bottle in the first place is best.”


For WM , big garbage is big business. With


almost 13 million tons of recyclables han- dled in 2011, 367 collection operations, 355 transfer stations, 273 active landfill disposal sites, 16 waste-to-energy plants, 134 recy- cling plants, 111 landfill gas projects and six independent power production plants, WM services 20 million residential, industrial, municipal and commercial customers in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. They’ve got 21,000 trucks in their global fleet. Here in Spokane, according to WM spokesperson Robin Freedman,


52 SPOKANE CDA • March • 2013


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204