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the centre of the field are two spectacular horse chestnut trees, one with white candles and one with red candles. You pass between these two solitary trees and under their touching branches. The path is tarmacked, about 3 feet wide and the corn stands waist high. This is the largest and the middle of the three fields and at the end of this is a tree lined hedge and another metal turn to be crossed, one walks over a w


stile. On entering the last field ide drove running parallel to the


hedge which extends at right angles to one's path to the left and to the right of you, leading one's eyes to distant country pictures of tall trees, rookeries and ricks.


Now you can see Meldreth Station, a way side halt like those of a model


train set. You cross the last field of corn at the edge of which the path leads you up the battleship-grey brick steps built by British Rail (formerly ER) straight out of the field onto the platform.


Above: Mr Cross, the stationmaster, pictured at Meldreth Station. Mr Cross retired in 1976.


The inexperienced newcomers then cross the footbridge to the other platform to buy their ticket. But the seasoned travellers walk to the end of the platform and cross the rails where it says “Passengers must not cross the lines” but nobody worries. There is only one antique porter- cum-ticket-collector-cum-station master, and one can see down the railway lines in either direction for miles and miles for the lines are straight and flat across fenland from Cambridge to Royston.


The journey to King's Cross is comf ortable and a delight, even though


one changes from a two-car diesel to an eight-coach electric train at Royston. The diesel train pulls up behind the waiting train for London on the same platform at Royston; and waiting for you are eight coaches for about twenty passengers on a fast service to King's Cross.


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