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that the reader can easily access the designer-maker’s work and even arrange to meet in person. It is this personalised aspect which makes the book unique and will appeal most to the reader.


Mary explains, “The business of


handmade and craft has become more desirable and accessible in recent years; with an increase in independent shops selling such wares and the advent of the online marketplace with key players such as Etsy and Folksy.


has worked with retailers to produce bespoke and exclusive ranges, including cushions for Harrods, Selfridges and the British Museum to name but a few.


London certainly has the range of art, fashion, design and contemporary craft required, to warrant a book that will guide and introduce you to


66 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2012


wonderful designers and makers in studios and shops around the town and beyond.


The book encompasses five areas of London - North, East, Central, South and West – and profiles each designer-maker along with images of their work. Moreover, contact details


are provided for each so


However, this is still quite an impersonal and distant retail experience. We know how important it is for buyers to meet face to face with the person who designed and made the item they are purchasing. That is why handmade markets and events have become so popular. This book encourages and facilitates the relationship between buyer and seller, connecting the reader with the designers who are right there on their doorstep.”


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