This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
‘Directory of Garments’ which shows a thumbnail photo of all the projects in the book together with the page number.


A word to the wise though, this book is not for the beginner knitter. The patterns include cabling, lace, Fair Isle and other motifs, and are all


rather complex. Also, it is not


for the impatient knitter! Although the patterns have been updated for twenty-first century tastes and adapted for modern yarns, they are still knitted on small needles with fine yarns. Think 2.75mm needles and sweaters worked in separate pieces then all stitched together at the end. A lot of us knitters have become spoilt with thicker yarns and larger needles. Working seamlessly in the round cuts the knitting time on a sweater considerably and practically removes the need for sewing at the end of a project.


However, the appetite for vintage patterns is still huge and knitters can struggle with working from


59 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2012


the original patterns as everything - from needle size to yarn weights and types – is different now. Also, patterns were written with much less explanation in the past as knitting skills were much more commonplace than they are now. Modern patterns have much more clarification around stitches and special techniques needed.


When you are working on a pattern and you’re unsure of the stitches or techniques, a useful trick to know is how to add a ‘lifeline’. A lifeline is made from a contrasting piece of waste yarn (I often use dental floss). Thread up a large-eyed needle with your lifeline and then run it through all the stitches on your needle. If you make a mistake you only need to unravel your work back down to where the lifeline is. Then you can easily slip the stitches back on to the needle without losing any. You can move your lifeline up every few rows as you work them.


I find that this greatly improves


my confidence when knitting complicated pieces. I’ve seen my tension change in my knitting from before and after adding lifelines as my hands relax on the needles! (You can find instructions and images for adding lifelines on my website. Just go to www.lisamargreet.com and search for ‘lifeline’.)


Something else you might like to take into consideration is the need to make a circular gauge swatch when working items in the round. Your tension is often very different from when you work on straight needles on flat pieces. Making a circular gauge swatch is similar to making an i-cord in that you work the right side stitches as usual and then you trail the yarn around the back, moving the work along your circular needles to the other end imitating working in the round. Then you start knitting again from the left to right with the right side facing you as before. This is much easier to see than explain in words so search on YouTube for “circular gauge swatches” to see a


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