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Well, for the shopkeeper, setting up a temporary business in an empty shop can provide:


1. Access to cheap and well-located spaces.


2. A means of promoting an existing online shop and building relationships. 3. Access to a new audience and a new sales channel . 4. An environment in which to experiment with how their work is presented. 5. A chance to market research new ideas, products, services and brand developments. 6. An opportunity to test entrepreneurial skills and ideas.


30 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2012


For the local community, a pop-up shop ideally: • Puts to use a resource that would otherwise stand empty. • Brightens and enlivens its surroundings, making the area more attractive to visitors in general. • Gives people more choices of different places to shop. • Offers them a range of products that they may not normally have the chance to buy. • Draws them into a welcoming environment, less intimidating than, for example, a formal gallery.


For the landlords of the empty


premises, the advantage of a shop popping up in an otherwise empty


property is: • A potential reduction in rates. • The property is in use and being cared for. • People are attracted back to the area.


As Mary Portas observes in her review of the future of our High Streets, empty properties are not just a private matter for the landlord; they affect us all and “innovative solutions could add value not just to the individual properties but to the surrounding area”.


One of the proposals made in ‘The Portas Review’, is that empty local authority properties on the High


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