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News & Views Star struck in Bournemouth


Former Oasis front man Noel Gallagher made a surprise appearance at a Bournemouth restaurant ahead of his band’s appearance in the town, visiting the Little India, in the company of other group members.


This is not the first time restaurant owner Abu Sorwar has served famous customers. In 2002 he transported a meal to the USA for rapper Ice-T and two years later served Jennifer Ellison at his Bournemouth restaurant.


Only One Direction to follow on Christmas Day


Rather than a traditional Turkey roast dinner, One Direction star Liam Payne opted for a curry at a local Indian restaurant this Christmas Day. The singer and his family turned up at the Penn Tandoori in Wolverhampton, enjoying a meal that included shish kebab starters, chicken tikka bhuna with rice and naan bread.


Liam used to visit the restaurant with his parents before he became famous. After the meal he happily posed for photos with a number of fans. He may be a millionaire now but it seems his dad picked up the bill for the Christmas meal. Some things don’t change!


Money no object for Monaco


Monaco may be one of the richest places in Europe but it seems they lack a good curry restaurant. Recently a Monaco family ordered food from the Taj restaurant at Corfe Mullen near Bournemouth, having eaten there during a visit to the UK.


The food was frozen for the 650 mile delivery and featured various tikka and


madras dishes and side orders. In total the bill including delivery costs came to over £1000.


“Anyone can order a frozen takeaway no matter how far away they live,” Sammy Islam, the manager of the Taj is quoted as saying. “A lot of people who order our frozen curries are expats. They say they can’t find the same taste elsewhere so this seemed like a great idea.”


Spice Business Magazine 8 January/February 2013


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