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March 15-17


Loren Roberts is “The Boss of the Moss.”


TOSHIBA CLASSIC


SOMETIMES IN GOLF, you live by the sword and you die by the sword. In Loren Roberts’ case, that very good sword is his putting. Throughout his career, he’s been one of the game’s finest putters (Not for nothing is his nickname “The Boss of the Moss”).


But at last year’s Toshiba Senior Classic, if his putting didn’t kill him it was a near-death experience. Seeking his first Champions Tour victory in 35 starts, Roberts had a four-stroke lead but watched it vaporize on the final nine holes, where he made three bogeys in the last five holes. Two particularly interesting moments came on Nos. 16 and 17, where he missed putts from inside six feet. To his great relief, he managed to make a five-footer on the final hole for the victory.


TINKERING WITH HIS MECHANICS PAID OFF “I was struggling with my putting last year to be honest with you,” Roberts said. “I made a big change last week at home when I was messing around with it and looked at some old films, and I saw that my shaft position at impact—before when I was putting good—I had a little bit more shaft lean.”


The conventional thinking on the Champions


Tour is that golfers have a five-year window for winning from when they join the Tour at 50. At 56, Roberts was starting to wonder if his time had passed.


“People always say the cutoff date is 55. I was getting a little worried about it. This really was huge for me today,” Roberts said. “I’ve got some things to work on my golf swing. We all do. We are never happy with how we play.” ■


CHARLES SCHWAB CUP STANDINGS PLAYER


EVENTS POINTS


Bernhard Langer Dan Forsman Corey Pavin


Loren Roberts


Mark Calcavecchia Kenny Perry Michael Allen Jay Haas John Cook


Jay Don Blake www.pgatour.com


4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4


387 307 270 263 246 240 239 203 200 186


POINTS BEHIND


80


117 124 141 147 148 184 187 201


1 1 1


1 WINS TOP 10


3 1 1 1 3 1 2 3 2 1


13 The Toshiba Classic victory


was the 13th of Loren Roberts’ Champions Tour career (the first


win in 35 starts), which moves him into a tie


for 20th on the all-time victory list with Jim Thorpe.


Course Insight NEWPORT BEACH COUNTRY CLUB


Billy Bell designed Newport Beach Country Club, which opened in 1952, and did a masterful job of fitting the holes to the site. By the late 1990s, however, the decision was made to hire architect Ted Robinson to oversee a renovation. Robinson preserved the basics of the original design, which placed a premium on thoughtful shotmaking.


Tournament Record 194, Jay Haas, 2007


Tournament 18-hole Record 60, Tom Purtzer, 2004 60, Nick Price, 2011


GOLF CHANNEL


Ticket Information www.toshibaclassic.com


PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2013 151


Newport Beach Country Club (Par 71/6,584 yards) Newport Beach, California


© PGA TOUR IMAGES/ STAN BADZ


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