This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ÊÊ for ÊÊÊÊ Ê


QtheUEENÕÕ SÊÊ AWARDS ENTERPRISE


L I F E TIME Ê .Ê A C HI EV EMENT Ê .Ê AWAR D Carmel Gahan


A Welsh speaking Irishwoman described as an inspiration to entrepreneurs across South Wales for more than 30 years has expressed her surprise and delight at being honoured with the Queen’s Award for Lifetime Achievement in Enterprise Promotion.


Carmel Gahan, director of Ross Carbery Limited in Swansea, has been singled out for the Lifetime Achievement Award, which is given to only one recipient a year for outstanding, consistent and eff ective promotion of business enterprise skills and attitudes over a substantial period of time. She is the fi rst Irish citizen to win this prestigious award.


During her career, Carmel has supported hundreds of businesses across South Wales to create and sustain thousands of jobs.


“I am really thrilled and honoured to have been recognised for this award, news of which came as a huge surprise to me,” said Carmel, who is originally from West Cork and came to Wales as a 21-year-old in 1975, when she started to master the Welsh language. “This award is thanks to all the wonderful people and businesses that I have worked with in Wales over the years.”


Among the many successful businesses she has worked with across South Wales are BAW Precision Engineering, Premier Group Construction and Support Options.


22


She is now an advisor for the Welsh Government’s fl agship Workforce Development Programme, helping businesses in Wales improve their performance and achieve growth through better management and training. As well as being an Investors in People advisor, Carmel recently became a mentor on the High Potential Start Programme in Wales. Her career in Wales began in 1980 when she was a volunteer board member at Antur Teifi , the fi rst local enterprise agency in Wales, where she was instrumental in setting up the Women Into New Technology project, a pioneering technology programme for women.


“I went around knocking on doors trying to get women to join the course and got ‘shown the door’ by some husbands who were concerned that there would be no-one at home to cook their meals,” recalls Carmel. “I have had some lovely comments from women over the years


Hugh Burnett


who took that course, about how it changed their lives for the better.


“To create jobs you must have skills and businesses, and in a rural area, especially at that time, the opportunities were limited. That’s what got me into supporting other people to start ventures of their own.”


She went on to become project co-ordinator for Graduate Enterprise, forerunner of the UK Graduate Enterprise Programme before setting up her own consultancy company to provide business development services.


Since then she has been director of a vanguard programme to get businesses connected to the Internet at the University of Wales Swansea and a mentor for Graduating to Enterprise (g2e), the Wales Graduate Start up Programme, the Potentia Project for women and lone parents and has also mentored unemployed people into self-employment.


Carmel was nominated for the Queen’s Award by her former project manager at g2e, Jacqui Niven, who is now a director of Fix Training in Cardiff .


Jacqui says: “Carmel was at the forefront of entrepreneurship education in Wales long before policy was implemented,” she said. “Since 1980, she has kept at the coalface of enterprise in Wales, working directly with around 1,800 clients, always encouraging them to think big and grow, impacting the Welsh and UK economy.


“She is undoubtedly an unsung hero of business support in Wales. In over 30 years of pioneering work, fostering a culture of entrepreneurship in Wales, she has inspired and nurtured hundreds of entrepreneurs and has only ever secured the spotlight on their behalf.


“She has genuinely devoted a lifetime to promoting enterprise in Wales and thoroughly deserves recognition for her achievement.”


On retiring and selling his Newhaven manufacturing company, Hugh Burnett felt that what was being done to help new businesses to get going was not right or suffi cient. With particular interest in manufacturing, (without that this country will not generate enough to prosper, and the natural creative skills that British people have would not be used), he arranged to purchase a 23,000 sq ft factory where new businesses could develop and grow without the time and cost overheads of all the externally imposed bureaucracy. “We manage most of their bureaucratic business issues for them and let them get on with managing their production and market”.


“Young businesses know their trade very well, but they are not necessarily very good at the business skills, nor do they have the funds to employ administrators. We give them the opportunity to develop their product and let us take care of the administrative aspects of their businesses, and become a friend with whom to share disappointments and celebrate success. We are informal, available when needed and streetwise.”


The result is that they have had over 20 companies through the organisation since 2004, none have failed whilst in our care, and between them the companies have created some 80 new jobs. The operation is cost neutral, operates as a charity.


“It is possible to help young businesses to grow without huge government fi nancial injection.” says Hugh, “We could always have done better, and I hope that others will consider the model we have created and perhaps off er more and better than we have.”


“I am extremely honoured and grateful to those who put my name forward. It is a huge recognition and a wonderful accolade for our project to promote both manufacturing and Enterprise.”


www.queensawardsmagazine.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156