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No other character, cartoon or otherwise, occupies a similar space in the hearts and minds of consumers across the globe as Mickey Mouse. As the number one character franchise in the world, Mickey Mouse and his friends are some of the most recognisable names on the planet.


Oh boy! F


irst bought to life in 1928, Mickey Mouse is Disney's most famous character. For over 80 years he has served


as the company's mascot, acting as a symbol of The Walt Disney Company and – along with his friends Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, Daisy Duck, Goofy and Pluto – forming an important part of Disney's core portfolio of evergreen franchises. Mickey Mouse is the number one


licensed character in the world and the UK. He also won the prestigious Best Classic Licensed Property Award at the 2012 Licensing Awards; in recognition of his universal reach and enduring appeal.


While Mickey Mouse and related


merchandise appeals to teens, adults, kids, toddlers and babies alike, with such a diverse audience it’s important that Disney develops targeted programmes by age, gender and character. “Preschool is key for us,” explained Justine Finch, franchise business director for The Walt Disney Company UK and Ireland, “and there is still a strong retro adult and teen fanbase, so we have been targeting the slightly older boy audience.” Fun, humour, action and adventure are


some of the key ingredients for this age group, which means that gaming (such as the Epic Mickey series) forms an important part of the approach.


A special max publishing


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disney publication 2013 ©Disney


It’s Mickey!


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